Your Very Next Step newsletter for May 2013


Your Very Next Step newsletter for May 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Me thinks that the moment my legs begin to move, my thoughts begin to flow.”

– Henry David Thoreau

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

***  This edition of Your Very Next Step comes to you from the “Lion City,” Singapore.

 

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

You are now among 591 subscribers.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

You may note that our YVNS newletter  (www.yourverynextstep.com) has received a make-over.  Bear with Ned as he learns how to use it.

 

*** In this issue:
***  Ned, the Alien’s have landed!

***  When an aircraft goes into a stall…

*** Hiking 101: Stay safe in the sun

***  20 Best Hotel Pools Around the World

***  CampMor’s OUTDOOR SOCKS 101

***  New airline fees that will make you hot

***  National Trails Day

***  Fight Comic

***  Singapore’s DRAGON BOAT RACES

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: May 2013

Virginia’s Virginia Creeper National Recreation Trail

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Nicodemus Wilderness Project , Help Save Our Environment & Wildlife, SIOUX FALLS,  SD

2.)  Volunteering with Adventure program, Plan My Volunteering PVN Nepal, Kathmandu, Nepal

3.)  Excavating Another Dinosaur, Williams Spring Archeological Dig,  Passport in Time Program, Medicine Bow-Routt NF, near Newcastle, SD

4.)  Wilderness Ranger (BWCAW),  Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, Ely, MN

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Sonoma Youth Ecology Corps Crew Leader, Conservation Corps North Bay, Cotati, California

2.)  Outreach & Public Relations Coordinator, Pennsylvania Parks and Forests Foundation, Camp Hill, PA

3.)  Kayaking & Snorkeling Guide, La Jolla Sea Cave Kayaks, La Jolla, CA

4.)  Event Intern- US Open of Surfing (Summer 2013), IMG, Los Angeles, CA

5.)  Paddleboard Instructor, SUP Iowa, Inc, Okoboji, IA

6.)  Alligator/Zebra Handler and Photographer, Wild Florida, Saint Cloud, FL

7.)  Boat Washer/Dock Master, Freedom Boat Club, Palmetto, FL

8.)  Director of Education, Audubon Canyon Ranch, Glen Ellen, California

9.)  Administrative Assistant, Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation, Philadelphia, PA

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned, the Alien’s have landed!

 

Hi Ned,

 

Here’s a destination you may want to keep an eye on for a future visit or “Your Very Next Step” mention. Aurora, Texas is trying to get a UFO festival off the ground and the “alien” mascot is named Ned.

http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Texas-Roswell-considers-exploiting-alien-visit-4488887.php (I’ll send you the full print version via snail mail.)

 

Thanks for your continued dedication to producing JOTW. I recommend it to anyone who wants to see what’s going on in the communications job market, even if they’re happily employed at the moment. Who knows, there might be an even happier match among the listings. (The alternative selection writer-comedian job #56 looks kind of interesting, doesn’t it?)

 

Cheers,

 

Susan

 

Susan H. Burnell, APR

Imagination Ink – Business Writing & Public Relations

Houston, TX

 

***  Singapore:

 

I really like Singapore.  It’s neat, clean and safe.  It’s Asian and exotic with out the smells of smoke and sewage.  It reminds me of Hawaii.  In fact, Singapore is about half the size of Oahu in land area, and has more than five times as many people, almost 5.2 million.

 

***  It’s hard to explain what happens when an aircraft goes into a stall.  This shows you.

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=c32_1367332518

 

*** From the American Hiking Society:

 

Hiking 101: Stay safe in the sun

While most of us enjoy warm, sunny days, we also need to be careful about the time we spend in the sun. Roughly 20% of Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime but there are many things each of us can do to help prevent this.

When enjoying a sunny hike, be sure to:

•             Limit time in the midday sun;

•             Use SPF15 or higher sunscreen; apply 15 minutes before going outside;

•             Wear a hat and cover up;

•             Wear sunglasses that block UV rays; and

•             Be aware of your local UV index.

For more information on sun safety visit the Environmental Protection Agency’s page about being Sun Wise.

 

http://www2.epa.gov/sunwise

 

***  20 Best Hotel Pools Around the World

 

This pops up every few years…but there are some new ones on this list:

 

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/20-best-hotel-pools-in-the-world?ref=news_fd_051113

 

***  CampMor’s OUTDOOR SOCKS 101

http://outdoors.campmor.com/outdoor-socks-101/?cm_cat=TRAILMAIL&cm_ite=TrailMail-April262013&cm_pla=51330

 

***  I’ll be looking for the Singapore Dragon Boat Regatta, which starts this wekend in Marina Bay.

 

DBS MARINA REGATTA – DRAGON BOAT RACES

 

18 & 19 May

 

Expect lots of action in the waters as close to 140 international and local teams, including the national teams from Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines and Singapore, paddle it out.

 

The 200m races will be held on 18 May and 500m races on 19 May. The overall winners of the eight categories will walk away with SGD 195,000 in total cash prizes, the highest prize monies for a dragon boat race!

 

Also, don’t forget to check out the Cosplay Festival and Drum Challenge at the Regatta Village between races as you soak in the atmosphere and join in the fun along the Waterfront Promenade!

 

http://www.dbsmarinaregatta.com/index.html

 

***  I was going to send you this newsletter just before I left Singapore on Sunday, but my visit to the Dragon Kiln couldn’t be shared in enough detail, so I have put that off until next issue.  I’ll send you the May issue today.

 

***  I attended “Fight Comic” at The Basement on the campus of Singapore Management University on May 17th with Phillip Raskin and GF Kim.

 

http://www.meetup.com/Singapore-Fun-Events/events/119104702/

http://www.timeoutsingapore.com/performance/comedy/fight-comic

 

***  National Trails Day

 

On June 1st, thousands of outdoor recreation activities are happening in every US State.  So don your favorite pair of boots, grab some friends and hit the trail.  Events include hikes, bike rides, paddling trips, horseback rides, stewardship projects and more.

 

http://www.americanhiking.org/ntd-events/

 

***  Just in time for summer: New airline fees that will make you hot

 

By Michelle Singletary

 

It’s not even summertime, but you may get hot and bothered by a slew of new airline fees.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/just-in-time-for-summer-new-airline-fees-that-will-make-you-hot/2013/05/16/0f51f052-bd97-11e2-97d4-a479289a31f9_story.html

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: May 2013

Virginia’s Virginia Creeper National Recreation Trail

By Laura Stark

“The trail brings a lot of economic benefit to the town — [Tourists] come to do the Creeper, then come in to do other things in town.”

Bicycling 68 miles in a day would be an accomplishment for most people. But doing it nearly every day is a testament to endurance and willpower. At 81 years of age, it seems an impossibility. Meet Lawrence the Legend. On any day of the week, you’re likely to see Lawrence Dye, a slender man with big glasses, pedaling along the Virginia Creeper National Recreation Trail on a bike that he says has been “a great friend.” Often dressed in bright yellow, Dye is hard to miss. He’s traveled the trail’s length—34 miles—roundtrip several times a week for more than 20 years, racking up over 175,000 miles.

 

“The trail is a huge part of Lawrence’s life,” says Beth Merz, area ranger for Mount Rogers National Recreation Area, a portion of which the trail runs through. “He’s one of those folks that actually goes up the mountain.”

 

The mountain Merz is referring to is Whitetop, part of the Blue Ridge range in southwestern Virginia. At nearly 3,600 feet, it’s the high point of the Virginia Creeper National Recreation Trail and is thought to be the genesis of the Virginia Creeper nickname for the railroad, because the trains had to creep up the slope. The moniker was also a nod to the vine of the same name prevalent in the region.

 

“The train climbed up the shoulder of Whitetop Mountain,” says Wayne Miller, president of the Virginia Creeper Trail Club. “There are stories about its slowness. As it climbed up that steep grade, you could almost get out and walk alongside it.”

 

To avoid the challenging climb, many visitors to the rail-trail park at Damascus, a lower point on the trail, ferry their bicycles on a shuttle up to Whitetop Station (a replica depot and visitor center) and coast back down to their cars. The trail continues on to Abingdon, but this 17-mile eastern leg, managed by the U.S. Forest Service, is one of its most popular sections.

 

“I think the main reason they come in the numbers that they do is because it’s pretty simple,” says Kevin Costello, director of tourism for the Abingdon Convention and Visitors Bureau. “There are eight outfitters to choose from that take visitors up to Whitetop. It’s the user-friendliness that makes it so popular.”

 

The Virginia Creeper – officially Norfolk & Western (N&W) Railway – extracted resources, primarily lumber, out of the region in the early 1900s. It also carried iron ore, passengers, and mail. Three miles west of Whitetop lies a remnant of this railroad era.

 

“Green Cove is the real deal,” says Merz. “It’s the oldest station on the trail and was the center of the community. Green Cove Station was a post office, general store, and cargo location. There are artifacts on display — like the original mail boxes — and it frequently features photography exhibits or live music from local groups. It’s quite an attraction.”

 

The trail is heavily used from Memorial Day to Labor Day, but the variety of leafy trees along it — maple, birch, oak, beech, and poplars — wow visitors in the fall and push the trail’s peak usage to October.

 

At its midpoint is Damascus, aptly nicknamed “Trail Town, USA” for its convergence of several trails, including the Creeper. The famed Appalachian Trail, stretching more than 2,000 miles from Georgia to Maine, runs down Main Street. Last year, Budget Travel named it one of the “Coolest Small Towns in America,” specifically citing the community’s welcoming trail culture.

 

“Damascus is a little mill town that was saved by the trail,” says Miller. “It was on its last legs. The old industries were shutting down. Now it supports eight bike shops that service the trail.”

 

This month, the town of less than a thousand is about to get a whole lot bigger. Trail Days is coming, and with it a twentyfold increase in the town’s population.

 

“Trail Days is centered around the Appalachian Trail,” says Aaron Sizemore, Damascus town manager. “Lots of catching up goes on during Trail Days. It’s a reunion for hikers past and present. The first part of week, they trickle in. By Wednesday, they’re coming from out of town, bringing tents, and the town is packed; around 20,000 come.”

 

This time of year is also one of the prettiest. “In the spring, you’ll see mountain laurel and rhododendron blooming along the trail,” says Merz. “Down below trestle number 21, you’re just riding through white and pink beds. The mountain laurels are thick along there.”

 

There are so many trestles along the route that each is numbered with an identifying plaque at either end of the bridge. Originally, there were more than 100 along the railroad over the region’s web of picturesque creeks and rivers; 47 trestles remain on the rail-trail today. Some are quite short, less than 100 feet long, but the longest are more than 600 feet.

 

In contrast to its heavily wooded eastern end, the section between Damascus and Abingdon is much more open and pastoral. Here, the trail flattens out, breaking from the wilderness into farmland and more populated areas.

 

Long ago, Abingdon was known by a different name. The story goes that when famous frontiersman Daniel Boone hunted here in the fall of 1760, a pack of wolves came out of their lair and attacked his dogs. He named the area Wolf Hills, which stuck until Black’s Fort was built in 1774. Today, Costello calls Abington “a touristy town” and rightly so; the town is rich with attractions, including Barter Theater, one of the longest running theaters in the country; Martha Washington Inn, a women’s college in the 1850s and later a Civil War hospital; and a 20-block historic district.

 

Mollie, an N&W steam engine dating back to 1907, sits adjacent to the Creeper trailhead on a small band of track. Her smaller-than-standard size made her more nimble for the railroad’s steep terrain, sharp curves, and wooden trestles that couldn’t support a heavier engine’s weight. And the work of O. Winston Link, who captured classic images of the N&W trains in the 1950s, is on display in the Abingdon station. One of the biggest draws is the rail-trail itself, which ends just south of Main Street near the center of town.

 

“The trail brings a lot of economic benefit to the town,” says Kevin Worley, director of Abingdon’s parks and recreation department. “We average 250,000 annually using the trail. It’s a popular destination point. They come to do the Creeper, then come in to do other things in town.”

 

The trail is also the catalyst for a new way of thinking. “We have a new urban pathway project to connect sidewalks and create linkages that steer more people to the trail,” says Costello. “People are embracing being able to ride a bike more often. The trail has inspired that type of philosophy in town.”

 

But it wasn’t always this beloved. When it was first suggested that a trail be built in the railroad’s place, adjacent landowners put up a fight. It was 1977, the year the trains stopped running. Inspired by the burgeoning rail-trail movement, Dave Brillhart and French Moore, Jr., members of the Washington County Planning Commission at the time, proposed the idea.

 

“When word got out that we were wanting to make a trail out of it, well, all these people that lived out there, they were just furious with me and anybody who talked about it,” recalls Moore in a 2009 interview. “They were so mad about it.”

 

At first, opponents put baled hay, downed trees, and locked gates across the trail to block its use. One of its trestles was even burned.

 

“People thought: ‘We don’t want trashy people in our backyard,'” says Miller. “Once the trail was declared nonmotorized, they realized that responsible people were using it and the trail could bring in sustainable tourism. Slowly people came around.”

 

“The trail is our economic engine,” says Sizemore. “It’s the biggest one we’ve got. It’s the thing that keeps us going.”

 

Many regional events, which boost tourism in the area, feature trail activities. Coming up in early August, the weeklong Virginia Highlands Festival, celebrating Appalachian arts and crafts, offers a chance to meet the soft-spoken and beloved local celebrity Lawrence Dye in the annual Ride with the Legend outing on the Virginia Creeper Trail.

 

When asked what his favorite part of the trail is, Dye responds, “I love all of it. The trail is just a beautiful place to be.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  Nicodemus Wilderness Project , Help Save Our Environment & Wildlife, SIOUX FALLS,  SD

http://www.volunteermatch.org/search/opp316870.jsp

 

2.)  Volunteering with Adventure program, Plan My Volunteering PVN Nepal, Kathmandu, Nepal

 

Volunteering with Adventure program

 

2 weeks PVN-Nepal Adventure program

1st Day     –     Arrival – Welcome dinner.

2nd Day     –     Language Training + Sightseeing.

3rd Day     –     Language Training + Sightseeing + Family stay information.

4th Day     –     Staying with local family and volunteering.

5th to 10th Day –     Volunteering on the project, staying at a local host family.

11th Day     –     Go to Chitwan Jungle safari

12th Day     –     Chitwan National Park Activities.

13th Day     –     Traveling back Kathmandu and report writing.

Final Day     –     Feedback and good bye dinner.

 

 

4 weeks PVN- Nepal Volunteer program

1st Day     –     Arrival – Welcome dinner.

2nd to 4th Day     –     Language training, Staying at hotel and family.

5th to 20th Day     –     Volunteering on the project, Staying at a local host family.

21st to 24th Day     –     go to Chitwan Jungle safari Activities.

25th to 26th Day     –     Rafting, Camping at the Beach.

27th to 28th Day     –     Reternback to kathmandu.

Final Day     –             Feedback and good bye Dinner.

 

 

6 weeks  PVN-Nepal Volunteer program

1st Day     –     Arrival – Welcome dinner.

2nd to 6th Day     –     Language training, Staying at hotel and family.

7th to 28th Day     –     Volunteering on the project, Staying at a local host Family.

29th to 32nd Day     –     Chitwan National Park Activities.

33rd to 38th Day     –     Trekking – Staying at Tea house.

39th to 40th Day     –     Rafting – Camping at the Beach.

41st to 43rd Day     –     Traveling Back to kathmandu.

Final Day     –     Feedback and good bye dinner.

 

 

8 weeks PVN- Nepal Volunteer program

1st Day     –     Arrival – Welcome dinner.

2nd to 7th Day     –     Language training, Staying at Hotel and Family.

8th to 35th Day     –     Volunteering on the project, Staying at a local host Family.

36th to 40th Day     –     Chitwan National Park Activities.

41st to 48th Day     –     Trekking, Staying at Tea house.

50th to 52nd Day     –     Rafting, Camping at the beach.

53rd to 56th Day     –     Traveling up and down.

57th to 58th Day     –     Free day….

Final Day     –     Feedback and good bye party.

 

To know more about the Program please contact us info@pvnnepal.org

 

http://www.pvnnepal.org/page.php?id=87&page=Adventure Program

 

3.)  Excavating Another Dinosaur, Williams Spring Archeological Dig,  Passport in Time Program, Medicine Bow-Routt NF, near Newcastle, SD

 

Volunteer with archeological digs or historic restoration projects!

 

Medicine Bow-Routt NF

 

New! Excavating Another Dinosaur!

 

WY-4162

July 15-20, 2013 (including weekend)

 

Must commit to entire session

 

Another dinosaur, you say?! Well, same dinosaur we found in 2009, but join us this summer as we give the fossil a new home! Our project will entail removal of the second Triceratops we located during the 2009 survey in the Alkali Creek Paleontological Special Interest Area. We will exhume the dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation, using proven paleontological excavation techniques. Volunteers will remove matrix with shovels, pick axes, rock hammers, tooth brushes, and so on, and will then document and collect loose skeletal pieces. We’ll then apply plaster and burlap to remove the fossil for transport to and long-term curation at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology (SDSM&T) Museum of Geology in Rapid City. We may also have time to collect micro-vertebrate sites while we work on the dino fossil. This project should be another fun and interesting one, so we hope you’ll join us in July!

 

Number of openings: 15

 

Special skills: Must be physically capable of bending, sitting, standing, and/or kneeling for long periods each day, and in a variety of weather conditions (mostly hot!); previous excavation, pedestrian survey, fossil identification, and/or paleontological experience helpful, but not required

 

Minimum age: 15 years old, under 18 with a responsible adult

 

Facilities: Dispersed tent or RV camping in remote area of Thunder Basin NG; base camp tent with cook stoves, pots/pans, utensils; chemical toilets, hot water showers, water for drinking and cooking; optional caterer ($25/day for participants interested); volunteers responsible for personal camping equipment, food (if not opting for catering), and transportation

 

Nearest towns: Newcastle, 38 miles

 

Applications due: May 20, 2013

http://www.passportintime.com/

 

4.)  Wilderness Ranger (BWCAW),  Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, Ely, MN

 

Volunteers will be working with our Wilderness Rangers within the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW). Four duty stations are availabe: Cook, Ely, Grand Marias, and Tofte and each of these offices are taking applications.

 

The BWCAW is approximately 1 million acres that borders Canada. Travel within this wilderness is done mainly by canoe and portages (trails) are utilized to go from one lake to the next. This particular program begins in the first part of June and ends usually in mid to late August. The ending date is flexible, but we do prefer a commitment of 2-3 months. Free lodging is available in our newly constructed dorm style housing units and has most of your basic amenities. A subsistence reimbursement is also given to those that are accepted.

 

The first week in June is dedicated to training. Some of this training includes: crosscut saw use, basic trail and backcountry campsite maintenance, First Aid/CPR, canoe and watercraft operation, and proper use and care of hand tools. The main tools that we use are: crosscut saws, pulaskis, shovels, nippers, axes, etc. Another useful tool in the evening is a fishing pole.

 

A typical two week schedule consists of 7-8 days and nights camping, canoeing, and working hard within the BWCAW followed by six days off and then back in the woods for another 7-8 days. Our experienced Wilderness Rangers typically work from 7am to 5:30pm while in the BWCAW. Expect to paddle about 8-15 miles a day and portage (carry) your share of camping gear, tools, and canoes across those trails that connects our many lakes. During the work day Wilderness Rangers will be maintaining those backcountry primitive campsites and logging/brushing out those portages as they travel. Sometimes you might stay at the same campsite within the BWCAW and other times you may be camping at different sites on different lakes throughout your 7-8 days. Most of the basic camping gear is supplied by the US Forest Service. This gear includes: tent, sleeping bag, thermarest, stove, pots/pans, fuel, water filter, life jacket, and paddle. This will all be supplied in one Duluth Pack and is yours to utilize for the summer.

 

When the work day is done and you are free to do whatever you like whether it’s fishing for trophy size walleyes and bass, swimming in our pristine lakes, or reading a book as the sun sets. Our volunteers in the past have said this was one of the greatest experiences that they have had. The only regret that you may have is not applying.

 

There are also numerous other volunteer opportunities that is available on the Superior National Forest. Some of the possibilities include but are not limited to: wildlife surveys, GPS/GIS, Adopt a Canoe Route, trail clearing, etc. Contact Steve Cochran for further details.

Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

Address:  1393 Hwy 169 Ely, MN 55731

Contact:  Steven Cochran 218-365-7610

Availability:  11/1/2012–10/1/2013

Created:  5/3/2013

Suitability:  Adults

Difficulty:  Strenuous

http://www.volunteer.gov/results.cfm?states=MN

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Sonoma Youth Ecology Corps Crew Leader, Conservation Corps North Bay, Cotati, California

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=421500017

 

***  From Bill Seiberlich:

 

2.)  Outreach & Public Relations Coordinator, Pennsylvania Parks and Forests Foundation, Camp Hill, PA

OVERALL SUMMARY: This position utilizes appropriate tools and strategies to advance our mission, build public awareness, attract project sponsors and partners, and to create an environment of support for our programs.

POSITION ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS
– Strategy Development: Develop and implement media and marketing campaigns and activities to promote awareness, involvement, and loyalty towards PPFF and our programs.
– Coordinate direct mail and communication pieces including-could include design, editing, printing, processing, and mailing.
– Prepare/Write content for and proofread newsletters, brochures, letters and other materials for grammar, style and content.
– Assist with special event planning, sponsor solicitation, organization, and marketing. Serve as primary liaison and coordinator for annual awards banquet.
– Offer presentations to corporate lunch and learns as well as to tourism, civic and business clubs for promoting PPFF and building of partnerships.
– Work to promote PPFF and our mission through social media and our website.
– Work with the Board of Directors to assist in their outreach and fundraising endeavors
– Assist in implementing the overall PPFF development and strategic plan.
– Develop and maintain wide list of media contacts and respond to media calls in timely manner.
– Perform grant research.

Financial: Rate of $16.50-$17.00/hr; 28-30 hours per week. Benefits:
Flex time, Simple IRA after one year employment, vacation after one year employment.

POSITION ESSENTIAL REQUIREMENTS
– Ability to think creatively, generate new ideas, develop strategies and follow through.
– Ability to meet deadlines and balance multiple projects; ability to work within budget.
– Superb written & verbal skills; able to work successfully in team environment and in small office setting. Strong organizational, administrative, time management and interpersonal skills.
– Commitment to the mission of the Pennsylvania Parks and Forests Foundation
– Publisher, PowerPoint, Excel, social media required; web design experience preferred.
– Ability to work Saturdays and evenings as necessary; travel required.
– Ability to withstand long periods of sitting, extensive computer work; lifting up to 25 lbs.
– BA or BS in public relations, communications, marketing, or equivalent experience.

Contact: Send resume and writing sample by May 17th, to Marci Mowery,
Pennsylvania Parks and Forests Foundation (www.PaParksAndForests.org), 1845 Market Street, Suite 202, Camp Hill, PA 17011 or ppffnewsletter@pa.net.

 

***  From mark Sofman

 

3.)  Kayaking & Snorkeling Guide, La Jolla Sea Cave Kayaks, La Jolla, CA

http://bit.ly/ZPSdSV

 

4.)  Event Intern- US Open of Surfing (Summer 2013), IMG, Los Angeles, CA

http://bit.ly/ZPTaKY

 

5.)  Paddleboard Instructor, SUP Iowa, Inc, Okoboji, IA

http://bit.ly/ZPSK7l

 

6.)  Alligator/Zebra Handler and Photographer, Wild Florida, Saint Cloud, FL

http://bit.ly/ZPTtFt

 

7.)  Boat Washer/Dock Master, Freedom Boat Club, Palmetto, FL

http://cb.com/ZPUttf

 

8.)  Director of Education, Audubon Canyon Ranch, Glen Ellen, California

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=25917

 

***  Also from Bill Seiberlich:

 

9.)  Administrative Assistant, Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation, Philadelphia, PA

Organization: The Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation
(GPTMC) is a private, non-profit organization that promotes leisure
travel to Philadelphia and The Countryside®. GPTMC builds the regions
economy and image through destination marketing that increases the
number of visitors, the number of nights they stay and the number of
things they do. These efforts enhance the quality of life and sense of
pride for residents. For more information regarding GPTMC, please go to
http://www.visitphilly.com/about/.

Position: A pivotal, primarily administrative position in GPTMCs
Communications Department, the Administrative Assistant keeps the
department running smoothly, working directly with the VP of
Communications on the VPs scheduling and department meeting scheduling;
meeting, event and media distribution support and accounting.
The primary areas of responsibility for this position are as follows:

Communications Assistance
– Manage calendar for VP of Communications, as well as all departmental
meetings and internal events
– Track and keep up-to-date Communications Department calendar of
external meetings
– Process, file and save invoices, AMEX statements, cash
reimbursements
– Write up Payment Authorization Forms (PAFs) for all invoices
– Assist in organizing VPs work-related travel
– Take charge of coordinating logistics for all internal and external
departmental meetings
– Track and distribute all media subscriptions and team memberships
– Assist in supporting and, in some cases, working at events (e.g.,
GPTMC press conferences, July 4th and New Years Week press conferences
and events, Made in America media tie-in events, sports/playoffs media
opportunities, both GPTMC annual events, Philly 360 annual event, events
in key feeder markets, etc.)
– Create presentations for monthly all-staff meetings representing the
Communications Department output
– Set up monthly budget meetings
– Actively participate in all department and staff meetings
– Provide project assistance to directors in the Communications
Department: content development, material preparation, and
PowerPoint/video/collateral coordination, correspondence and
coordination for related conferences, meetings, and presentations.
– Manage any special projects assigned by the VP

Media Assistance
– Work with Media Analyst to learn and support our media monitoring,
distribution and reporting efforts, becoming proficient and able to
stand in when necessary for the MA to produce daily, monthly and special
media coverage reports
– Pull targeted media lists as needed, working with Media Analyst
– Distribute press releases to customized Cision database and special
email lists
– Gain/develop in-depth knowledge of the destination, particularly the
areas of emphasis for GPTMC, our media news room, and our content
assets, including photography and video
– Reply to media inquiries and redirect as appropriate
– Assist in execution of selected visiting journalist program (VJP)
trips as determined by director of media relations and director of
communications
– Be an active member our corporate communications team, providing
perspective and input on all aspects of the work we do to promote
Philadelphia as a destination.

Qualifications
– At least one year of administrative experience, preferably in a
communications department
– Experience multi-tasking, creating and managing Outlook calendars,
planning and arranging all aspects of meetings
– Strong computer experience/skill, including functional knowledge of
Word, databases such as Excel and PowerPoint for creating presentations
and reports
– Ability to organize and retrieve complex information, such as media
lists, that are tools for the department
– Good budgetary skills
– Strong organization skills and attention to detail
– Responsible, flexible, proactive and interested in learning
– Knowledge of and passion for the city and the five-county
Philadelphia region
– Strong communications skills
– Sensitive to confidential information; not willing to engage in rumor
or innuendo
– Ability to establish priorities and meet deadlines

Education Requirements: Bachelors degree

GPTMC is an Equal Opportunity Employer that encourages candidates of
all backgrounds to apply for this position.

Contact: Please send a cover letter, resume and salary requirements
to: jobs@gptmc.com. Thank you for your interest.

 

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