Your Very Next Step newsletter for July 2013


Your Very Next Step newsletter for July 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“Man is so made that he can only find relaxation from one kind of labor by taking up another.”

― Anatole France

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

 

“Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

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Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Hiking with Dogs

***  The Top 10 Places to Eat Ice Cream

***  The road less traveled

***  In Wildness Benefit concert

***  I love this idea:  Rent-a-Backcountry-Canoe

***  Festivals we missed for 2013:  FinnFest

***  Track any 787 flight

***  Get miles for your pet

***  It’s Hot Out There… Enjoy the Water Safely and Responsibly

***  HAMMOCK CAMPING 101

***  Appalachian Trail Hikers Are Going Digital

***  10 Most Wi-Fi Connected US Airports and 10 Least-Connected

***  Rare Black Jellyfish Seen at San Diego Beaches

***  Palau’s Jellyfish Lake

***  Stranger things have happened in hotels

***  8 Far-Flung Walking Sojourns

 

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: July 2013

Illinois’ Rock Island Trail

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  SEASONAL PARK ATTENDANT at Button Bay State Park, Vermont State Parks, Ferrisburgh, Vermont

2.)  Russian Olive Removal and Chipping Along the Poudre River Corridor, CSFS Volunteer Program, Fort Collins, Colo.

3.)  Wisconsin Frog and Toad Survey, Wisconsin DNR, madison, WI (Survey locations throughout the state)

4.)  Visitor center volunteer, Wisconsin State Park System, Various locations in Wisconsin

5.)  Tillamook State Forest, Oregon Department of Forestry, Tillamook, OR

6.)  Forest watch volunteers, Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Various locations

7.)  Pacific Northwest Trail Volunteer Trail Crew, Pacific Northwest Trail Association, Sedro-Woolley, WA

8.)  CRANE INTERNSHIP, Audubon Species Survival Center (SSC), Audubon Nature Institute, New Orleans, LA

9.)  Insect Keeper Intern, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO

 

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Communications Manager, California Native Plant Society, Sacramento, California

2.)  Avian Field Assistants: migrant use of hardwood habitats, Old Dominion University, Virginia / Maryland

3.)  Executive Director, Seattle Audubon Society, Seattle, Washington

4.)  Outreach Specialist, Center for EcoTechnology, Northampton, Massachusetts

5.)  Park Ranger Assistant, Sacramento County, Sacramento, CA

6.)  Park Ranger, Lifeguards, booth and Grounds Maintenance, Saginaw County Parks, Saginaw, MI

7.)  PARK RANGER II (RESTRICTED), Hillsborough County, Tampa, FL

8.)  Full Time Ranger, The Wildlands Conservancy, Wind Wolves Preserve, California

9.)  Outdoor School – Instructor, REI, Fairfax, VA

10.)  Park Ranger, City of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA

11.)  Marketing and Communications Intern, National Audubon Society, Inc., New York, NY

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  The road less traveled:

 

Dear Ned,

 

I was so captivated by your storytelling that my very next step – which should have been working on a rather pedestrian assignment – detoured to places I’ve never been. Thanks for sharing your adventures and authentic observations from UAE, India, Singapore and parts beyond. I don’t always travel vicariously, but when I do, I choose YVNS.

 

Carry on! (your luggage and your fine travel narratives)

 

With appreciation from Texas,

 

Susan

 

Susan H. Burnell, APR

 

***  Cape Cod:

 

We had a very brief “vacation” at the family house in Harwich, Mass.    It’s been in the family since 1937.  This time the house had a “for sale” sign on the front lawn.  I spent time cleaning the attic and garage, doing some yard work and taking five loads to the town landfill.  But we still made time to go out to a couple of our favorite dinig establishments, Ruggis’s for breakfast;Bonatt’s for melt-a-ways, of course; Buca’s Tuscan Roadhouse; and The Port for dinner; and Sir Cricket’s for seafood.  We made the obligatory visit to the Bird Watchers General Store, where both Tom and I told jokes and we each got a pencil.  We also saw our picture on the wall, winners in the t-short contest, taken in the Gros Ventre wilderness during ArrowCorps 2008 (http://birdwatchersgeneralstore.com/Contest2012.htm).

 

Barbara and I were going fishing, so we bought a flounder rig and some sea worms at Goose Hummock shop.  In fact, we caught a fish on the first day on the Wychemere Jarbor jetty.  On the second morning Tom came with us.  In trying to free the hook in some seaweek he slid on the rocks, which put an end to fishing.  He’s fine, but it was painful.

 

We went to a Harwich Mariners game against the Orleans Redbirds.  The Mariners were behind when we left (we waited until the 50-50 winners were announced, and we won a ten dollar gift certificate to Ruggi’s) because we wanted to get to Sundae School before they closed (http://www.sundaeschool.com/Locations.aspx).  We thought we saw lightening on the way home.  Tom checked huis smart phone which informed us there was zero percent chance of parcipitation.  It was coming down in torrent when we got home.

 

We got our residents beach parking sticker for the last time, and enjoyed walks on Bank Street beach and at Sand Pond and Seymours Pond.

 

We sepent a few days in Aubuirndale at my mother’s house before Laura and the kids returned to Washington and I stayed behind to help out for a week or so.

 

The Cape house has been sold. But I can always hear the twang of the rusty spring and the slam of the screen door.  In fact, I can hear it right now, and I can imagine myself walking out onto the soft grass in my bare feet.

 

***  In Wildness Benefit concert

 

September 22nd, 2013 we will be celebrating our trails and rivers with a fundraising concert to be held at the Seattle Mountaineers Program Center. The In Wildness Benefit concert will help to create regional visibility and lend support to the PNTA, the Wild Rivers Foundation and the Seattle Philharmonic Orchestra.

http://www.pnt.org/inwildness.html

 

***  Hiking with Dogs on travels fur and near…

http://www.outdoors.org/publications/outdoors/web/hiking-with-dogs.cfm

 

***  The Top 10 Places to Eat Ice Cream

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Event-Planning/SM-Top-10/Articles/The-Top-10-Places-to-Eat-Ice-Cream/

 

***  I love this idea:  Rent-a-Backcountry-Canoe

 

…Canoes are available at quite a few of the back country pond sites.  $1/hour on the honor system in the back country though some sites closer to the road need a key you pick up when you check in…

 

http://www.trailspace.com/forums/trip-reports/topics/146513.html

 

***  Festivals we missed for 2013:  FinnFest

 

On Midsummer’s Eve 1865, some thirty Finns and Sámi landed on the shores of the Portage Canal in Hancock, Michigan, and began work in the copper mines the next day. Though much has changed since then, we have maintained many of the traditions these people brought with them, forming our own unique Finnish American culture that reflects our roots and our continued ties to Finns worldwide.

 

Hancock remains a pivotal center of Finnish American culture.So join us at Midsummer — our legendary winter snows will have melted away, revealing stunning surroundings to immerse yourself in. We are ready to provide you with an unforgettable FinnFest experience, done in true Copper Country style — copper over gold, sauna over spa and pasty over pâté. We’ll have our coffee brewing, our saunas warming, and our communities ready to welcome both new and longtime friends.

 

http://www.finnfestusa2013.org/

 

***  This is cool:

 

I’ve flown a lot of different aircraft, including the new 787-8, A-380 and 787.

 

There aren’t so many of them in the world…so you can use this Google Earth application to see where every inflight 787 is at the moment, from multiple points of view.

 

This is a cool app that lets you track any 787 flight:

 

http://www.newairplane.com/787/dreamliner-live/

 

Frequent felines?

 

Dogs and cats that travel on a Virgin Australia domestic flight can now collect points for their owners that can then be used to obtain discounts on future flights.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/travelnews/10157175/Pet-miles-reward-frequent-fliers.html

 

***  It’s Hot Out There… Enjoy the Water Safely and Responsibly

http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/outdoor-report/2013/07/10/#intro

 

***  HAMMOCK CAMPING 101

 

Learn the basics of hammock camping and experience a different way to sleep and relax on your next camping trip!

http://outdoors.campmor.com/hammock-camping-101/#fbid=OsOFUai_NGF

 

***  From Bernie Wagenblast’s TCN Newsletter:

 

Appalachian Trail Hikers Are Going Digital

Link to article in The Star-Ledger:

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2013/07/appalachian_trail_goes_digital.html

 

10 Most Wi-Fi Connected US Airports and 10 Least-Connected

Link to article on Skift:

http://skift.com/2013/07/18/10-most-wi-fi-connected-u-s-airports-and-10-least-connected/

 

(I think this is misleading.  It shows which airports have the most connections with a paid service.  For me, I conne3ct for free, or not at all.)

 

 

***  Rare Black Jellyfish Seen at San Diego Beaches

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/52492141/ns/local_news-san_diego_ca/t/rare-black-jellyfish-seen-san-diego-beaches/

 

***  Palau’s Jellyfish Lake

http://travel.ninemsn.com.au/glance/329443/jellyfish-lake-draws-a-crowd.glance

 

***  Stranger things have happened in hotels

 

Would you share a hotel room with a stranger to get money off your bill?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/travelnews/10182183/Sleep-with-a-stranger-for-a-half-price-room.html

 

***  8 Far-Flung Walking Sojourns

 

by  Larry O’Hanlon

http://news.discovery.com/adventure/travel/walking-sojourns-130701.htm

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: July 2013

Illinois’ Rock Island Trail

By Laura Stark

 

“The trail has become part of the fabric of their lives.”

 

Midway between Chicago and St. Louis, lies a rail-trail of such character and beauty that it inspired a lifetime of trail advocacy in not just one, but two recipients of our highest honor, the Doppelt Family Rail-Trail Champion Award. One of these champions, former U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood grew up in Peoria, which anchors the southern end of the Rock Island Trail that winds through central Illinois.

 

“He’s been a direct friend of the trails in Illinois and the Rock Island Trail—no doubt about it,” says George Bellovics with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR), which manages most of trail. “His legacy is well known and appreciated by people in the area.”

 

The other is George M. Burrier, Jr., who heads the Friends of the Rock Island Trail group and has been involved in the trail’s development for more than 30 years.

 

Such devotion to the trail is not unusual. “We get a lot of local users,” says Bellovics. “The trail has become part of the fabric of their lives.”

 

IDNR’s portion of the trail, which stretches 26 miles from Toulon to Alta (just north of Peoria), has a distinct country feeling: rolling farmlands, splashes of wildflowers, and leafy canopies offering a cool respite in the warm summers. A railroad relic, the Spoon River trestle bridge, offers postcard-perfect views. “The trail is a slice of Midwestern Americana,” says Bellovics.

 

Just a few months ago, the nonprofit organization Trails for Illinois released a report, Making Trails Count in Illinois, which shared the results of a 13-week usage study on six trails throughout the state, including the Rock Island Trail. The study, done in partnership with Rails-to-Trails Conservancy, showed that the trail’s average estimated annual use ranged from 3,380 on its rural northern end to 36,535 on its urban southern side.

 

“Those figures may seem small compared to trails in larger metro areas,” says Steve Buchtel, Trails for Illinois’ executive director, “But for small communities outside Peoria, like Toulon with a population of less than 2,000, they’re connected to a trail that sees thousands of people. That’s quite an economic opportunity.”

 

The small country towns that the trail goes through—Toulon, Wyoming, Princeville, Dunlap, and Alta—are known for their hospitality. Eric Oberg, trail development manager for RTC’s Midwest Regional Office, recalls seeing a “Trail Users Welcome” sign outside a bar and grill right off the trail in Toulon with staff that “couldn’t be more accommodating or nice.”

 

And the trail is proving to be of value to residential developers, too. “Tons of residences are going up along the trail,” says Michael Friberg, a project manager for the Peoria Park District. “They all have put in connections to the Rock Island Trail, which speaks highly of it being a benefit.”

 

Buchtel hopes the report will help build the case for the economic value of trails. “The old mindset was: ‘Trails just don’t bring business,'” he says. “It’s exciting to have data that shows otherwise and profoundly. We found that a third of survey respondents made a purchase while using the trail.”

 

Oberg also points out that, “The trail counts showed the untapped potential of the trail. The counts could be even higher, but there’s a lack of awareness. The trail is a wonderful amenity that’s underused.”

 

This lack of awareness is an issue that Buchtel agrees with and he hopes in the future that the state will promote more trail-based tourism.

 

“When I speak to groups, there will be 150 people in the room,” says Buchtel. “I’ll ask, ‘Who’s been on the Rock Island Trail?’ and almost no one raises a hand. But if I ask who’s been on the Elroy-Sparta, hands in the whole room go up. We have trails that can go toe-to-toe with theirs, but Wisconsin invites people to come.”

 

At the time that the Elroy-Sparta State Trail opened in 1967, the history of the Rock Island Trail was just beginning. The trail’s corridor was donated to IDNR in 1969 by a nonprofit group, the Forest Park Foundation, who had acquired it from the Peoria and Rock Island Railroad a few years earlier. In 1973, the land became a state park, but the idea soon arose to develop a rail-trail through it to increase its accessibility and value. Resistance from adjacent landowners who instead wanted to claim the property for their own was swift and furious. When trail work began between Toulon and Wyoming, trail champion Burrier helped to restore a bridge set on fire by opponents.

 

Progress continued, but sometimes covertly. In 1986, the Friends of the Rock Island Trail secretly purchased the last remaining depot on the line. Today, Wyoming Station serves as a visitor center and railroad museum.

 

“We bought it from one of our supporters and I did the legal work,” says Burrier, a former attorney. “We spent a few years restoring the depot, then gave it to the IDNR. Now, those same people that opposed the trail are volunteering in the depot.”

 

All 26 miles opened in 1989 and the rail-trail was officially dedicated the following year in a ceremony Burrier well remembers. “There was a lot of excitement for the people that had fought for so many years.”

 

More than 20 years later, the Rock Island Trail continues to grow. “It’s set to extend into downtown Peoria and on down to the Illinois River,” says Oberg. “That extension is going to be huge. People will be able to use Peoria as a starting or stopping point for the trail with all the amenities that a big city has to offer.”

 

This newer, urban section at the southern end of the Rock Island Trail is being managed by the Peoria Park District. Over the course of its development, this section has gone by a few other names, such as the Pimiteoui Trail and the Kellar Branch Trail, which are no longer officially used. When complete, the extension will run continuously from the state-owned section ending at Alta down to the Bob Michel Bridge, a distance of about 14 miles, all paved. A few short segments are currently open to the public, but the remainder is slated to be finished by the end of the year.

 

The extension provides access to two Peoria attractions that opened just last year: the stunning Riverfront Museum and the family-friendly Caterpillar Visitor Center, showcasing exhibits by the familiar black-and-yellow branded construction equipment company that’s headquartered here. Older, but no less worthwhile attractions, include the historical Springdale Cemetery founded in 1855 and Glen Oak Park, which dates back to the late 1800s and houses a zoo, botanical garden, fishing lagoon and other recreational amenities.

 

Unfortunately, heavy rainfall has caused washouts and other problems for IDNR’s portion of the trail, which has a crushed limestone surface. “Recently, there’s been damage to the trail due to some wicked storms,” says Bellovics. “We’ve closed off portions of the trail and are making repairs. There’s a closed segment of three miles between Toulon and Wyoming that includes the Spoon River bridge. Although there’s no detour signage, you can get around it easily with low-volume local roads.”

In addition to the repair work, which IDNR hopes to have mostly completed over the next few weeks, the organization is upgrading and paving all six of the trail’s access parking lots, adding new entrance signs, and creating trail kiosks. The projects should be done by the fall, in time to enjoy the trail’s bright autumn hues.

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  SEASONAL PARK ATTENDANT at Button Bay State Park, Vermont State Parks, Ferrisburgh, Vermont

 

Seasonal park attendants wanted for immediate hire. Performs general mainte-nance and park operations. Position reports to the park ranger. Must be highly motivated and enthusiastic, able to work with little supervision. Helpful friendly attitude and ability to provide excellent customer service. Duties include grounds keeping; facility and equipment maintenance; cleaning rest rooms; taking reservations and fees. Must be able to lift heavy items and work outdoors in hot and sunny or cold and rainy conditions. 40 hrs/week. Weekends included, times may vary, $8.68/hour.

Button Bay, a 253-acre park, is located on a bluff in Ferrisburgh along the 130-mile long Lake Champlain. Historically, the area has been visited by such notables as Samuel De Champlain (1609), Ethan Allen (1776), Ben Franklin (1776), and Benedict Arnold (1777). What once operated as a farm, opened as a state park in 1964. The park is so named for the button-like concretions formed by clay deposits found along the shoreline.

 

Apply online by clicking on ‘How to Apply’

 

http://www.vtstateparks.com/htm/buttonbay.htm

http://www.vtstateparks.com/htm/employment_jobs.htm

 

2.)  Russian Olive Removal and Chipping Along the Poudre River Corridor, CSFS Volunteer Program, Fort Collins, Colo.

 

Saturday, August 24

 

•We will assist Larimer County staff and volunteers in this project

•Work will take place along the Poudre River corridor near Timnath and the River Bluff’s Open Space

•We will need qualified sawyers for cutting. If you wish to cut, you must provide proof of your S212 or equivalent saw certification

•Meeting location: Fort Collins District Office, 3843 Laporte Ave., Fort Collins

•Time: 7:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. (we may return earlier)

•Transportation: We will carpool in CSFS vehicles

•Contact: jamie.dahl@colostate.edu

 

The CSFS Volunteer Program provides an opportunity for you to help us enhance public understanding of forestry’s role and value in a healthy natural environment through hands-on projects and training.

 

http://csfs.colostate.edu/pages/volunteer-opportunities.html

 

3.)  Wisconsin Frog and Toad Survey, Wisconsin DNR, madison, WI (Survey locations throughout the state)

 

The main goal of this survey is to determine the status, distribution, and long-term population trends of Wisconsin’s twelve frog species. Annual statewide surveys began in 1984, and it is now one of the longest running amphibian monitoring projects in North America. Participants choose an established route and conduct three night-time surveys a year: in the early spring, late spring, and summer. No formal training is necessary, but volunteers are asked to follow a simple protocol, fill out and submit data sheets, and familiarize themselves with the different frog calls.

http://dnr.wi.gov/volunteer/animals/FrogsToads.html

 

4.)  Visitor center volunteer, Wisconsin State Park System, Various locations in Wisconsin

 

•Greet visitors and provide brochures, maps, program schedules and answer questions.

•Assist park visitors with vehicle admission stickers, campsite registration and state trail passes.

•Staff a visitor center information desk or gift shop.

•Help coordinate special events.

•Help design and prepare exhibits, displays, and bulletin boards.

•Help market and advertise park programs.

•Provide newsletters, brochures, fact sheets, and information about the local area.

 

•Find a State Park, Forest, Recreation Area, or Trail (http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/parks/findapark.html).

 

http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/parks/volunteer.html

 

5.)  Tillamook State Forest, Oregon Department of Forestry, Tillamook, OR

 

On the second Saturday of September, and October, the Oregon Department of Forestry hosts trail work parties on the OHV trail network in the Tillamook State Forest that are open to the entire OHV use community.

 

OHV trail work parties focus on some new trail construction but mainly on trail maintenance such as cleaning out drainage structures, blocking illegal trails, or clearing down trees and on trail upgrades such as installing drainage structures, spreading pit run rock to harden trails, or constructing reroutes to create a more sustainable trail system.

 

In 2012, volunteers from the OHV Community donated over 1,200 hours of their time to helping the Oregon Department of Forestry maintain the trails in th Tillamook State Forest.

 

If you’d like to get involved in helping to take care of the OHV Trails you love, check out the work party calendar and plan a trip to the Tillamook State Forest around a work party date.  It’s a great opportunity to give back and to learn more about the outstanding organizations that co-host the work parties with Oregon Department of Forestry staff.

 

RSVP POLICY

Due to ODF staffing levels, a minimum of 5 volunteer RSVPs will be required in order to guarantee that a scheduled work party will take place.  If you are interested in volunteering for a particular work party please contact the staff member listed by at least 24-hours prior to the date listed on the OHV Work Party calendar.

 

For More Information

Jahmaal Rebb

OHV Specialist

Forest Grove

503.359.7463

jrebb@odf.state.or.us

 

Dave Hiatt

OHV Specialist

Tillamook

503.815.7024

dhiatt@odf.state.or.us

 

http://www.oregon.gov/odf/tillamookstateforest/pages/ohvtrailworkparty.aspx

 

6.)  Forest watch volunteers, Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Various locations

 

Would you like to be a forest watch volunteer?

 

Forest watch volunteers in DNR’s Southeast RegionWould you like to be a forest watch volunteer?

Forest watch volunteers help protect and enhance DNR-managed land while working with the public to encourage appropriate recreation use. Volunteers also educate the public about the value of natural resources and DNR’s role as steward of more than 3 million acres of state trust lands.

 

What Do Forest Watch Volunteers Do?

 

Provide information to visitors.

Monitor and observe trails, sites, and facilities.

Document and report safety concerns and suspicious or criminal activities.

 

Expectations of forest watch volunteers

 

Provide friendly, courteous information and assistance to forest visitors.

Represent  DNR in a professional manner.

Complete all required training.

Follow safety procedures.

Serve within the scope and limits of assigned volunteer responsibilities.

Accurately report observations and complete required records and timesheets.

 

Benefits  to you, as a forest watch volunteer

 

Be a part of providing an important and meaningful service in protecting and enhancing state trust lands.

Learn new skills and information.

Improve recreation trails, sites, and facilities.

Meet other people who share a passion for outdoor recreation.

Enhance your resume with documented volunteer work experience. All state, county, and municipal job openings in Washington State permit each hour of qualified volunteer service to equal one hour of required work experience.

 

Contact:

 

Ken Dean

Forest Watch Program Coordinator

360-902-1701

kenneth.dean@dnr.wa.gov

 

http://www.dnr.wa.gov/RecreationEducation/Topics/OtherRecreationInformation/Pages/amp_rec_volunteer_watch.aspx

 

7.)  Pacific Northwest Trail Volunteer Trail Crew, Pacific Northwest Trail Association, Sedro-Woolley, WA

 

The construction of the Pacific Northwest Trail has been in the process for years by work crews organized and lead by the PNTA. Some of these crews are made up of volunteers who donate their time and effort to help develop and maintain the trail. If you are looking for a challenging activity that is both enjoyable and rewarding and that gives you the chance to work in the outdoors and be with some wonderful people, you’ve come to the right place! The PNTA, along with other hiking and equestrian groups, assists the US Forest Service, National Park Service, State Parks, and other agencies with the care of the PNNST.

 

The Pacific Northwest Trail Association’s has a number of active volunteer groups that work on different sections of the trail. To find a group near you start your search here: http://www.pnt.org/Trail_Maintenance.html.

 

http://www.pnt.org/volunteer.html

 

8.)  CRANE INTERNSHIP, Audubon Species Survival Center (SSC), Audubon Nature Institute, New Orleans, LA

http://www.osnabirds.org/Jobs/CRANE-INTERNSHIP.aspx

***  From Mark Sofman:

 

9.)  Insect Keeper Intern, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO

http://bit.ly/1auuO07

 

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Communications Manager, California Native Plant Society, Sacramento, California

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=371500008

 

2.)  Avian Field Assistants: migrant use of hardwood habitats, Old Dominion University, Virginia / Maryland

 

Employment Information

 

Are you interested in our migrant work in Virginia, Maryland or our long-term woodpecker work in California?

 

2013 Virginia / Maryland Field Work – Radar Analysis of Fall Migrant Habitat Use

 

Field assistants are needed for a new collaborative project using radar to examine migrant use of hardwood forest habitat during fall migration in Virginia and Maryland. Assistants will sample hardwood forests along the Atlantic Flyway to compare with radar assessments of bird use of these habitats.

 

The research involves sampling migrants by sight and sound in addition to assessments of habitat and food resources.

 

Must be highly motivated with the ability to identify Eastern migrants by sight and sound. An ability to identify common vegetation and insects of Virginia / Maryland is preferred. Assistants will be housed in one of three locations: Wakefield, VA; Wallops Island, VA; or Berlin, MD and will involve extensive travel to field sites each day (a vehicle is required, mileage will be reimbursed). Field work is rigorous and will involve hot, humid weather, including frequent encounters with biting arthropods.

 

Positions include a monthly stipend of $1,850 and up to $500 / month housing allowance. The positions will run from 7 August through 14 November, 2013.

 

I am also recruiting a graduate student to work on this project. See the radar page for more information.

 

Current Positions (Virginia / Maryland):

 

Fall 2013: 7 Aug to 14 Nov (1 position); Wakefield, VA – OPEN

 

Fall 2013: 7 Aug to 14 Nov (2 positions); Wallops Island, VA – OPEN

 

Fall 2013: 7 Aug to 14 Nov (2 positions); Berlin, MD – OPEN

 

http://www.ericlwalters.org/employment.htm

 

3.)  Executive Director, Seattle Audubon Society, Seattle, Washington

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=428900015

 

4.)  Outreach Specialist, Center for EcoTechnology, Northampton, Massachusetts

http://www.greatgreencareers.com/green-job/30816/Outreach-Specialist-Northampton

 

5.)  Park Ranger Assistant, Sacramento County, Sacramento, CA

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/sacramento/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=96398

 

6.)  Park Ranger, Lifeguards, booth and Grounds Maintenance, Saginaw County Parks, Saginaw, MI

http://www.indeed.com/cmp/Saginaw-County-Parks/jobs/Park-Ranger-467810d01e6f6c9e

 

7.)  PARK RANGER II (RESTRICTED), Hillsborough County, Tampa, FL

http://www.jobaps.com/hill/sup/BulPreview.asp?R1=C3925&R2=AA&R3=o24124

 

8.)  Full Time Ranger, The Wildlands Conservancy, Wind Wolves Preserve, California

http://www.greatgreencareers.com/green-job/30782/Full-Time-Ranger-Wind-Wolves-Preserve

 

9.)  Outdoor School – Instructor, REI, Fairfax, VA

https://www.rei.apply2jobs.com/HVExt/index.cfm?fuseaction=mHvexternal.showPositionDetails&pid=42&lid=319

 

10.)  Park Ranger, City of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/santabarbara/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=680070

 

11.)  Marketing and Communications Intern, National Audubon Society, Inc., New York, NY

 

Now in its second century, Audubon is dedicated to protecting birds and other wildlife and the habitat that supports them. Audubon’s mission is engaging people in bird conservation on a hemispheric scale through science, policy, education and on-the-ground conservation action.  By mobilizing and aligning its network of Chapters, Centers, State and Important Bird Area programs in the four major migratory flyways in the Americas, the organization will bring the full power of Audubon to bear on protecting common and threatened bird species and the critical habitat they need to survive.  And as part of BirdLife International, Audubon will join people in over 100 in-country organizations all working to protect a network of Important Bird Areas around the world, leveraging the impact of actions they take at a local level.  What defines Audubon’s unique value is a powerful grassroots network of nearly 500 local chapters, 23 state offices, 43 Audubon Centers, Important Bird Area Programs in 46 states, and 700 staff across the country.  Audubon is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE).

 

Position Summary:

 

The Marketing and Communications Intern will have the opportunity to build connections among Audubon staff and supporters. The position will include creating polished donor and staff communication documents, as well as actively assisting in the development of external facing marketing and communications efforts both online and in print. This is a part-time, paid internship, working approximately 20 hours per week from August, 2013 through October, 2013. The position reports to the Marketing and Communications Coordinator.

 

Essential Functions:

 

The position will include:

•Assisting with writing, editing, and designing communications for print, email and web

•Collecting, editing, and managing photo assets

•Analytics and reporting

•Occasional administrative tasks

•Other activities as needed to support the marketing and communications team

 

Qualifications and Experience:

•Excellent writing and editing skills.

•Superior organizational skills; attention to detail a must.

•Polished and professional, confident in communication with executive leaders.

•Some experience designing for print (InDesign) and/or web (including HTML for web and HTML email) a plus

 

https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/1806/marketing-and-communications-intern/job

 

 

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