Your Very Next Step newsletter for September 2013


Your Very Next Step newsletter for September 2013

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

“In wilderness is the preservation of the world.”

– Henry David Thoreau

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

 “Your Very Next Step” newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:

***  National Wildlife Federation Hike & Seek

***  The Top 10 Beach Cities

***  Virginia Cleanup Events:

***  Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup:

***  Meet Rippl

***  Trail Cameras

***  Yeah, there’s a fee for that:

***  10 Best National Parks for Fall Trips

***  Best Geocaching Websites:

***  TSA Expands PreCheck to Sixty Additional Airports

***  Chiggers:

***  RANKED: The Best Airlines In America

***  The Top 10 Ways to Sleep on a Plane

***  10 Perfect Outfits for Long-Haul Flights

 

***  National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: September 2013

California’s SMART Pathway

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Volunteer Opportunities, Rainsong Wildlife Sanctuary, Peninsula Nicoya, Costa Rica

2.)  Conservation Intern, National Audubon Society, Inc., Tiburon, CA

3.)  Volunteering Opportunities, Busch Wildlife Sanctuary at Loxahatchee River District, Jupiter, FL

4.)  Husky Ranch Adventure, offered through Fronteering Travel Services Inc., Yukon, Canada

5.)  Volunteer opportunity, Keep our parks beautiful, City of Sacramento Volunteer Program, Sacramento, CA

 

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  SPECIAL EVENTS AND COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER, Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR), Arlington County, Arlington, VA

2.)  Vice President Communications and Public Relations, Travel Portland, Portland, OR

3.)  Media Relations Manager, National Audubon Society, Inc., NY, NY

4.)  Story and Communications Curator, Marine Mammal Center, Sausalito, California

5.)  Tour Guide, Cave of the Mounds, Blue Mounds, WI

6.)  Bear Tracking – Conservation Biology Volunteers, Ecuador, Andean Bear Foundation, United States

7.)  Development Officer, Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Cortez, Colorado

8.)  Manager, Science Outreach Full-time, Ocean Conservancy, Washington, DC or Santa Cruz, CA

9.)  Manager, Digital Outreach and Fundraising, Ocean Conservancy, Washington, DC

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!
*** Do you have a travel adventure to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  National Wildlife Federation Hike & Seek

 

Find one in your area:

 

www.hikeandseek.org

 

Here’s the one near Washington, D.C.

 

Seneca Creek State Park

11950 Clopper Road

Gaithersburg, MD

October 19th

 

* A family-friendly hike through Seneca Creek State Park, Gaithersburg, Maryland

* Hands-on crafts and activities for kids ages 3-10 along the trail

* A scavenger hunt

* Live wildlife displays

* A chance to meet and take pictures with Ranger Rick

* And so much more!

Your youngsters will LOVE the special activities we have in store for them, such as meeting live wildlife, making a take-home butterfly, pressing leaves, hunting for salamanders and more! All especially designed to thrill kids age 3-10; toddlers and their grown-ups.

 

See Hike and Seek volunteer opportunities here:

 

http://www.nwf.org/Hike-And-Seek/Volunteer.aspx

 

***  The Top 10 Beach Cities

 

By Kate Mulcrone

 

National Geographic has pulled together this list of can’t-miss beach towns around the world. We’ve also included some stories to help you plan a meeting in one of these fabulous locales.

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Event-Planning/SM-Top-10/Articles/The-Top-10-Beach-Cities/?cid=eltrTop10

 

***  Virginia Cleanup Events:

 

Virginia Waterways Cleanup event (part of the International Coastal Cleanup) coordinates more than 200 cleanup events in September and October in Virginia — from the mountains to the ocean.  Last year more than 7,400 volunteers cleaned our waterways   keeping 491,505 POUNDS of plastic and trash out of Virginia’s rivers, bays and our world’s ocean! Join us at a cleanup this fall — You will not only feel good that you are making a positive difference, but the data you collect will be put to work in changing the littering behaviors of people sharing our earth.   Sign up by going to http://www.longwood.edu/cleanva/CleanupEvents2013.html and finding a cleanup that is convenient for you.

 

***  Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup:

 

http://www.oceanconservancy.org/our-work/marine-debris/

 

***  Meet Rippl

 

Rippl is a free mobile application that helps you make simple, sustainable lifestyle choices.

 

With Rippl, you’ll get:

 

•Free green living tips to help improve your day-to-day habits

 

•Ability to set goals and track your progress to show your impact

 

•Customizable alerts to help you succeed based on your needs, schedule and habits

 

•Science-based recommendations for proven ways to help grow a healthy environment

 

•Opportunity to suggest your own tips to the community and share your success with your friends

 

http://www.oceanconservancy.org/do-your-part/rippl.html

 

***  Trail Cameras

 

For land trusts and other land conservation organizations, trail cameras, also called game cameras, scouting cameras, or camera traps, can be effective ways to “see” what’s happening on your conservation land when you’re not there. Typical uses for these automated watchers include:
• search for and document cryptic wildlife such as bobcat
• determine deer population density
• count visitors/users
• deter illicit activity/identify people engaged in illicit activity (dumping, ATVs, poaching)

 

Some conservationists have been reluctant to take advantage of these cameras’ potential because of uncertainty about the legality of such surveillance. RI Natural History Survey (RINHS) with assistance from the Land Trust Alliance and the RI Land Trust Council investigated the legal issues involved in remote surveillance on conservation land in Rhode Island.

 

http://rinhs.org/partners-resources/trail-cameras/

 

***  Yeah, there’s a fee for that:

 

Ryanair agreed to accept American Express cards for a fee “of 2 percent of the total transaction value” on top of other booking fees. The Irish low-cost carrier cast the move as a play to gain more bookings from “business travelers, travel agents and corporate travel departments,” according to a statement attributed to deputy chief executive and CFO Howard Millar. He estimated that “20 percent to 25 percent of our passengers are traveling on business” and hinted at further plans to “roll out a range of business-tailored services.”

http://www.businesstravelnews.com/Expense-Management/Ryanair-agreed-to-accept-American-Express-cards-for-a-fee–of-2-percent-of-the-total-transaction-value–on-top-of-other-booking-fees/?ib=Airlines&a=mgmt&cid=eltrDaily

 

***  10 Best National Parks for Fall Trips

 

This is Ned’s favorite time of the year!

 

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/10-best-national-parks-for-fall-trips?ref=news_fd_091413#!1-intro

 

***  Best Geocaching Websites:

 

Ned’s comment:  My geocaching experience involved one excursion deep into the Wasatch mountains.  I found the cache, but more memorable was the water ouzel I saw.  I really haven’t used my Garmin GPS since.

 

http://outdoors.campmor.com/best-geocaching-websites/?cm_cat=TRAILMAIL&cm_ite=2013_09_06_Campmor_2013&cm_pla=52134&cm_ven=EMAIL#fbid=OsOFUai_NGFFor Defence Global

 

***  Welcome news:

 

TSA Expands PreCheck to Sixty Additional Airports

 

By Matt Alderton

 

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Conference-News/Event-Management-Compaines/Articles/TSA-Expands-PreCheck-to-Sixty-Additional-Airports/?cid=eltrMtgNews

 

***  Chiggers:

 

My recent family camping trip to the mountains outside Luray, Virginia, was my most recent exposure to chiggers.  I also have unhappy memories of getting chiggers on my legs just above my hiking boots after a hike through the Manassas National Battlefield.  This time I noticed them when I awoke and noticed a rash on my legs and torso.  I was wondering if I had bed bugs in my sleeping bag.  But two weeks later the bites are now subsiding.

 

Trombiculidae are a family of mites which bite their host in their larval stage and cause “intense irritation” or “a wheal, usually with severe itching and dermatitis,” and are called chiggers.

 

You can’t see them, and you don’t know that they’re on you right away.

 

http://www.medicinenet.com/chiggers_bites/article.htm

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trombiculidae

 

***  RANKED: The Best Airlines In America

 

I can’t say I agree with this list of the ten best airlines in America, seemingly based on on-time performance.  I would list them in ordwer of least worst.

 

http://www.sfgate.com/technology/businessinsider/article/RANKED-The-Best-Airlines-In-America-4809018.php

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-best-airlines-in-america-2013-9

 

***  The Top 10 Ways to Sleep on a Plane

 

By Kate Mulcrone

 

(Ned’s comment:  They left off the best one of all.  East a big meal and take a sleeping pill.  You’ll wake up when you smell the coffee somewhere over Ireland.)

 

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Event-Planning/SM-Top-10/Articles/The-Top-10-Ways-to-Sleep-on-a-Plane/?cid=eltrTop10

 

***  10 Perfect Outfits for Long-Haul Flights

 

Ned’s comment:  Sorry guys.  This Fodor’s story is just for girls.  I admit I have some favorite comfy clothes for long trips.  It can get damn cold on those planes, especially if you get the much sought after exit row.  And I also admit that I have a special pair of socks I save for the homeward bound legs…and feet.  One piece of advice: remember that you may need to shed layers to go through security, and you may have to take off your shoes, so pick hole-less-hose on travel days.  One lady ahead of me in the TSA line for a flight had to get down to a slinky tank top which exposed her slinky thong.  She turned to me and said, “I usually get dinner and a movie before I go this far.”

 

http://www.fodors.com/news/photos/10-perfect-outfits-for-long-haul-flights?ref=news_fd_092113#!1-intro

 

How about you?  Any wardrobe advice for fellow flyers?

Any interesting stories while going through security?

 

Send to Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: September 2013

California’s SMART Pathway

By Laura Stark

 

“They see this project as an enormous opportunity to reinvent themselves as a tourist mecca.”

 

 

When the sunset-hued Golden Gate Bridge first opened more than 75 years ago, it was the engineering marvel of its time. Just north of San Francisco’s famed bridge lies an equally impressive transportation corridor for a new era. When complete, the aptly named SMART Pathway will include the most miles of bike and pedestrian trail alongside active railroad, 52, in the country.

 

Though rail-with-trails are not a new idea—Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC) first reported on them in 1996—they are catching on as a way to create new transportation options in an increasingly constrained urban environment. Today, there are 168 rail-with-trails around the country, a whopping increase of more than 400 percent since RTC’s first report on these projects nearly two decades ago. An updated rail-with-trail report will be published this fall.

 

“We’re building it in the railroad right-of-way and the edge of the trail is pretty close to the tracks,” says Paul Klassen, project manager for the SMART Pathway. “Mostly it’s 10 to 15 feet away, though in some places it’s 100 feet away.”

 

The scope of the project is massive. The Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit (SMART) commuter rail line and parallel pathway will stretch 70 miles between Cloverdale and Larkspur. This dual transportation system will connect 14 train stations and 10 cities across two counties.

 

“The pathway goes through a lot of historical main street areas,” says John Nemeth, planning manager for the SMART District, which oversees the effort. “It alternates between open space and downtowns, so you can get on and off, and have lunch or go shopping. It’s a town and country experience.”

 

The Marin County Bicycle Coalition has been involved with the pathway since the idea was first conceived in the late 1990s. Its advocacy director, Andy Peri, says the pathway will “create an infinite number of connections. These towns formed along the old rail line. These are population centers with shopping, work places, and schools.”

 

While the area’s rugged hills offer a splendid natural backdrop and a wealth of recreational opportunities—the mountain bike was invented here in the 1970s—they restrict transportation options. “The rail-with-trail project follows Highway 101, which is the only north-south route through Marin County, so it gets quite congested,” says Barry Bergman, manager of trail development at RTC’s Western Office.

 

When traffic backs up, there are no alternative routes for commuters. Originally, only passenger rail service was planned to address the situation, but at the urging of county bicycle coalitions and other advocates, an adjacent pathway was added to the project. “We needed to alleviate congestion through multiple options,” says Carolyn Glendening, SMART’s community education and outreach coordinator. “Working in synergy held more promise than either option alone.”

 

At first, it took some persuading to get everyone on board with the pathway concept, but the project is well underway now. “It had to go through many levels of approval,” says Peri. “Environmental, legislative, funding… and, at every stage, the pathway was in jeopardy. You’re never done until you’re riding the path.”

 

A boost for the effort came in 2008, when a quarter-cent sales tax increase to fund both the rail and the trail was put to voters in Marin and Sonoma counties. A two-thirds supermajority was needed for its passage, and, in the end, nearly 70 percent of voters approved.

 

But the bloom fell off the rose as the recession hit soon after. “The sales tax money dropped off because of the economy,” says Gary Helfrich, executive director for the Sonoma County Bicycle Coalition. “So we had to consider where most people live, and develop that section first. Phase 1 will go from Santa Rosa to San Rafael—county seat to county seat—which are the two largest cities in the North Bay. Phase 2 will be the all the rest.”

 

Of this 38.5-mile stretch, Glendening says, “Phase 1 is fully funded and under construction, starting with the rail portion. The construction contract for some Phase 1 pathway segments will be awarded in the coming months, while other sections are currently under environmental review. Some are even likely to be open and operational before the rail service starts. Beyond Phase 1, the rail and pathway will be completed as funding becomes available.”

 

About five miles of the off-road trail are on the ground already and about a third of the on-road sections are signed and striped. Rail service is expected to begin by late 2015 or early 2016 with trains running every 30 minutes during peak weekday hours. Mid-day and weekend service will also be offered. The train cars will have room for bikes, allowing passengers to combine riding the trail and the train for recreation and commuting.

 

The combination of Sonoma County’s scenic vineyard countryside and Marin County’s craggy terrain may prove irresistible to tourists. “In Marin County, there’s a huge amount of open space,” says Bergman, who regularly hikes in the area with his wife. “There are redwood forests and a beautiful coastline. It’s gorgeous.”

 

The trail’s most unusual feature lies on its southern end: the Cal Park Hill Tunnel, a relic of Northwestern Pacific Railroad, which was active here in the early 1900s when northern California’s towering redwoods were being harvested for lumber. More than 100 years later, the SMART rail line follows that same corridor, converting the tunnel for the modern day by adding a separated trail for bicyclists and pedestrians alongside the trains.

 

RTC provided guidance to Marin County on the project and, inspired by the challenge, published a research report called Tunnels on Trails in 2001. The trail extends a short distance out either side of the 1,100-foot tunnel to connect San Rafael with Larkspur, where trail-goers can catch a ferry to downtown San Francisco.

 

“I was there for the groundbreaking of the tunnel, and this past July I had my first tour of this phenomenal facility,” says Marianne Fowler, RTC’s senior vice present of federal policy. “It’s a key part of the bike/ped infrastructure in Marin County.”

 

A critical piece of funding for the tunnel project was contributed by the Nonmotorized Transportation Pilot Program (NTPP), a federally-funded experiment designed to test the impact of making biking and walking infrastructure a priority of transportation planning. In 2005, Marin County was one of only four communities selected nationwide to receive a $25 million NTPP grant to develop these types of projects and report back on the changes that the investments made in travel habits and other measurable effects.

 

“RTC was instrumental in getting the Pilot Program included in transportation law,” says Fowler. “If Marin County hadn’t received that program grant, the tunnel would probably not have been built as a dual purpose, bike/ped and transit, facility.”

To the north, the SMART Pathway will end at Cloverdale, which, like other small communities along the corridor, stands to gain economically from the people that the SMART system will bring. “Cloverdale is a mill town that’s down on its luck,” says Helfrich. “But their city council really gets it. They see this project as an enormous opportunity to reinvent themselves as a tourist mecca.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

1.)  Volunteer Opportunities, Rainsong Wildlife Sanctuary, Peninsula Nicoya, Costa Rica

 

WHAT VOLUNTEERS CAN DO: Care for wounded or sick animals, Patrol beaches for turtle nests, Raise and plant tree saplings for reforestation

COSTS: Volunteering: Free!; Accommodations: Free!

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: One-month time commitment, Medical insurance

WEBSITE: www.rainsongsanctuary.com, facebook.com/pages/Rainsong-Wildlife-Sanctuary-Costa-Rica/141821105847000

CONTACT: Mary Lynn Perry (Founder), rainsongwildlifesanctuary@gmail.com, +506 2642 1265

 

http://barefootatlas.com/volunteer/rainsong-wildlife-sanctuary-costa-rica/

 

2.)  Conservation Intern, National Audubon Society, Inc., Tiburon, CA

https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/1837/conservation-intern/job

 

3.)  Volunteering Opportunities, Busch Wildlife Sanctuary at Loxahatchee River District, Jupiter, FL

http://www.buschwildlife.org/volunteer.html

 

4.)  Husky Ranch Adventure, offered through Fronteering Travel Services Inc., Yukon, Canada

 

The Experience

 

Venture to the Northern most territories of Canada for the adventure of a lifetime. Have the opportunity to dog sled and gaze at the amazing northern lights!

 

This ranch needs volunteers all year round and has many great opportunities! This project is a very remote area and your accommodation will be in style without the luxury comforts of the modern world. That means no electricity, but what is there cozier then a crispy and warm fire place? This ranch is extremely popular volunteer abroad project and is great place to experience the bush. Have many opportunities to dogsled during the long winter and of course play with the huskies! This project has excellent opportunities in winter however summer has great long warm days and many opportunities to hike, bike and is a great place for wildlife viewing. The work on the ranch is physically demanding and it is by no means an’ easy holiday option’! The minimum duration of stay is 4 weeks with a maximum duration of 12 weeks. Please consider that you are in a very remote area and this is not the place to be if you are solely interested in pubs and clubs.

 

Why?

 

Play with huskies and go dog sledding!

Live of the grid in a cozy cabin without electricity for the ultimate northern experience!

Volunteer in one of the most beautiful sceneries in the worlds and see the northern lights.

Opportunities for Wildlife viewing in the surrounding the property.

 

Key Start Dates:

 

January, April, July, October (book early in advance to be assured of a volunteer placement)

 

Volunteer duration:  12 weeks

 

Average Work hours:  5,5 days per week starting at 7-8 AM to 6-7 PM (with enough break time in between)

 

Number of Volunteers:  5

 

Volunteer accommodation:  Available

 

Housing Type:  Shared rooms

 

Internet Access:  Yes at the main lodge

 

Who Are They Looking For?

 

Love of the outdoors and a passion for wildlife is a priority. You should not be fussy, picky or hypersensitive about cleaning as this is one of the main chores.  We will not tolerate smoking, alcohol or the use of drugs. Please remember that you are a guest, therefore, respecting the rules is essential.

 

http://www.fronteering.com/trip/husky-adventure

 

5.)  Volunteer opportunity, Keep our parks beautiful, City of Sacramento Volunteer Program, Sacramento, CA

http://www.idealist.org/view/volop/cjgWXbmBJb3p/

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  SPECIAL EVENTS AND COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER, Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR), Arlington County, Arlington, VA

http://agency.governmentjobs.com/arlington/default.cfm?action=viewJob&jobID=721175

***  From Mac’s List:

 

2.)  Vice President Communications and Public Relations, Travel Portland, Portland, OR

 

Travel Portland, an organization dedicated to strengthening the economy by marketing the metropolitan region as a preferred destination for meetings, conventions, and leisure travel, is looking for a proven leader to join our team. The Vice President of Communications and Public Relations leads a dynamic team that targets domestic and international journalists, communicates key messages that reinforce the Portland brand, and secures editorial coverage that supports the organization’s sales efforts and fulfills Travel Portland’s contractual obligations. This position achieves success through the team by providing them with the necessary leadership, resources, and direction. The incumbent carries the full range of management responsibilities.

 This is a full-time, benefitted position working 37.5 hours per week from our stunning downtown Portland offices. The successful candidate must have a bachelor’s degree with major course work in communications, public relations or related field, 5 years of management level experience leading a team of public relations/media relations professionals or equivalent combination of experience, education, and training that would provide the skills required for the performance of the essential job duties. This position does involve travel and a valid driver’s license is required.

 

Travel Portland is an EEO/AA/ADA employer committed to diversity.

 

Application Guidelines/Contact:

 

To view the detailed job description for this position, please visit the Travel Portland website at http://www.travelportland.com/about-us/employment-volunteering. The position is open until filled. All interested candidates must apply on line at: jobs@travelportland.com.

 

https://www.macslist.org/macs-list/Travel-Portland/Vice-President-Communications-and-Public-Relations/pY4c1zdJkCdQ/

 

3.)  Media Relations Manager, National Audubon Society, Inc., NY, NY

https://careers-audubon.icims.com/jobs/1855/media-relations-manager/job

 

4.)  Story and Communications Curator, Marine Mammal Center, Sausalito, California

 

The Marine Mammal Center, an equal opportunity, non-profit employer, is seeking a Story and Communications Curator to join our team. The Marine Mammal Center’s mission is to expand knowledge about marine mammals—their health and that of their ocean environment—and to inspire their global conservation. Our core work is the rescue and rehabilitation of sick and injured marine mammals, supported by state-of-the-art animal care and research facilities, a corps of dedicated volunteers, and an engaged community.

 

The Story and Communications Curator is a full-time, exempt position with competitive benefits. This role requires a strong creative writer and editor who can bring the Center’s work to life through the written word via online and offline marketing channels to help build advocacy and donor support, and to connect with our community. This position is responsible for writing and coordinating email content, related website content and other marketing collateral content. Acting like an internal journalist for The Marine Mammal Center, the Story and Communications Curator has the ability to investigate, write and manage stories (that include scientific details) to appeal to a variety of audiences according to various marketing goals. Creativity, speed and accuracy are a must. This role requires an energetic, organized, creative, and highly detail-oriented individual who is self-motivated, an effective time-manager, and enthusiastic with an innate passion for animal welfar e and environmental conservation. This position reports to the Marketing & Communications Strategy Officer in the Advancement Department.

 

CORE COMPETENCIES

•Excellent grammar, with outstanding written and verbal communication skills

•Demonstrated ability to produce a large volume of story-driven, accurately portrayed written work in a fast-paced environment

•Demonstrated ability to take and edit good quality photographs to accompany content

•Intermediate proficiency with MS Office, specifically Word, PowerPoint, as well as Adobe creative suite, specifically Photoshop and/or AI to edit photographs

•Strong management skills with a team-oriented approach and demonstrated ability to work collaboratively cross-departmentally

•Ability to take direction and work autonomously to meet deadlines

•Creative and flexible out-of-the-box thinker; ability to present new thoughts and ideas regularly

•Good decision-making and problem-solving skills

•Superb time management and multi-tasking skills

•Committed to delivering high quality work with attention to detail

•Meticulous, organized, focused, responsible and trustworthy

•Friendly, self-motivated, proactive, a real go getter and positive

•Must have a positive, can-do attitude

 

MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIESContent Creation (50%)

•Conceptualize, research, and write engaging content for online marketing, fundraising and advocacy campaigns, including at least one or two emails and corresponding website content pages per week, and other marketing and PR related projects i.e. writing for blogs and marketing collateral items

•Disseminate all content created each week through to the various marketing and program channels according to the approved weekly plan (i.e. website, social media, (press if relevant), email, third parties etc.)

•Manage the Social Media Manager (a volunteer role) and provide all content to them with clear direction and according to the approved strategy

•Prepare all written and photo content for any partnership/sponsorship campaign

•Work closely with other departments of the Center and through that collaboration, help write and/or edit education, retail and vet sci content for collateral and the website

•Work closely with the Website Specialist to ensure emails and web content is created and uploaded correctly and on time

•Research and propose new content strategy ideas and tests

•Apply established messaging to a variety of marketing tools, taking into account space limitations, branding requirements, target audience and information hierarchy

•Attend weekly “Clinical Rounds” with the veterinary science department to research stories

•Contribute to the development of the content strategy and leads the weekly Content Meetings

•Work closely with the Marketing & Communications Strategy Officer, and Event & Marketing Assistant to research and write online story opportunities to increase visibility on the web i.e. identify relevant like-minded websites and blogs and submit latest news stories and build relationships

 

Editing and Administrating (30%)

•Edit the weekly Communiqué (written by the Executive Director) and Story of the Week (written by the Veterinary Science team)

•Convert science papers into consumer and press friendly 1-2 page synopses which are suitable to be published on the web

•Evaluate and monitor TMMC website content and amends or writes new copy accordingly

•Photograph relevant patients, people, places and products to accompany story, and edit in a photo editing suite

•Upload photographs and written content to an online website (CMS) and email (CRM) system

•Responsible for all media storage and systems, including photography and video

•Ensure compliance with the organization’s policies and procedures, and support the organization’s mission, values, and standards of ethics and integrity. Examples include: abiding by hospital protocol when required to go “behind-the-scenes”; ensuring factual accuracy by fact-checking with relevant departmental experts, receiving approval of story and content from departmental managers; ensuring the organization’s mission is inherent in all content; upload content to the relevant files and systems according to organizational policy

•Attend twice monthly marketing meetings with the Advancement Team to contribute to and update the Advancement Team on project status

 

Public Relations (20%)

•Work closely with the Event & Marketing Assistant to write press releases to support events and campaign launches

•If determined by Marketing & Communications Strategy Officer, serve as PR spokesperson on or offsite as needed

•Manage and work closely with the external PR agency to develop and execute the long-lead PR strategy

 

QUALIFICATIONS

•5+ years of experience writing and proofreading consumer copy in a journalism, marketing and/or nonprofit business capacity

•Degree in Journalism (preferred), English, Marketing, Creative Writing, Advertising, or related field

•Medium to advanced skill level with photographic and video equipment

•Awareness of web content management systems

•Knowledge of nonprofit writing styles and needs preferred

•Knowledge of marine mammals and/or ocean conservation a bonus but not required

•Knowledge of marine science a bonus

•Minimal knowledge of HTML a bonus

•Ability to provide own transport, and be willing to work occasional weekends as Center stories dictate.

 

Application Instructions:

To apply:

 

Please send a cover letter and resume attention Human Resources Director & IT Manager to admin@tmmc.org. Please put “Story and Communications Curator” in the subject line. Please no phone calls or faxed submissions.

 

http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/jobs/job_item.jhtml?id=322900012

 

5.)  Tour Guide, Cave of the Mounds, Blue Mounds, WI

 

General Responsibilities

• Welcome tourists and groups who come to Cave of the Mounds NNL

• Conduct safe, enjoyable, and educational tours

•Assist customers in the amazing rock & fossil shop

• Assist customers in the snack bar

• Help to maintain neat, clean and safe buildings and grounds

 

Duties

• Lead interpretive tours of the Cave that are safe, fun, and educational

•Tell the story of the Cave – its formation, growth, discovery, development, and protection – throughout all aspects of time

•Greet the public with a smile and helpful information so they will enjoy their visit to Cave of the Mounds National Natural Landmark

• Assist customers with the sale of merchandise and restock the amazing rock & fossil shop

•Serve customers at the seasonal snack bar in the Visitor Center

•Assist with the processing of merchandise including unpacking, marking, light manufacturing and storing

•Assist with the maintenance of the buildings and grounds through typical tasks and chores such as sweeping, mopping, trash removal, dusting, raking, etc.

 

Qualified Candidates will have:

• Excellent interpersonal communication skills and a friendly manner

•A desire for interaction with the general public and public speaking

• Interest in the natural environment, nature appreciation, nature education

• Good conflict resolution skills and desire to work as a member of a team

• The desire to do a wide variety of tasks in the course of a workday

 

Benefits

• You get to take people through a beautiful Cave!!

•Reciprocity with many, many awesome Wisconsin tourist attractions

•Super cool staff events such as off trail caving, fossil hunts, campfires, and barn movie nights

• Paid training and annual wage review

•The “coolest” summer job EVER!

 

Contact us at  608-437-3038 if interested in employment.

http://www.caveofthemounds.com/employment.htm

 

***  From Mark Sofman:

 

6.)  Bear Tracking – Conservation Biology Volunteers, Ecuador, Andean Bear Foundation, United States

http://bit.ly/1eUa4o1

 

7.)  Development Officer, Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Cortez, Colorado

http://www.execsearches.com/non-profit-jobs/jobDetail.asp?job_id=26432

 

8.)  Manager, Science Outreach Full-time, Ocean Conservancy, Washington, DC or Santa Cruz, CA

http://www.oceanconservancy.org/who-we-are/job-listings/manager-science-outreach.html

 

9.)  Manager, Digital Outreach and Fundraising, Ocean Conservancy, Washington, DC

http://www.oceanconservancy.org/who-we-are/job-listings/manager-digital.html

 

*** Send your job opportunities to share with the YVNS network to lundquist989@cs.com.

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