Your Very Next Step newsletter for January 2014


Your Very Next Step newsletter for January 2014

 

By Ned Lundquist
www.yourverynextstep.com

Isoja kaloja kannattaa pyytää vaikkei saisikaan.”

(Translation: Big fish are worth of fishing even if you don’t catch one.)

– Yhdistys Fyysikkoseurs,

 

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”
– Lao Tzu

 

***  This edition of YVNS comes to you from Helsinki, Finland.

 

“Your Very Next Step” adventure/outdoors/conservation newsletter, published by Ned Lundquist, is a cooperative community, and everyone is invited, no…encouraged, no…urged to participate.   Share your adventures with the network today!  Send to lundquist989@cs.com.

***  To subscribe for free:  http://bit.ly/JOTWSubscribe

 

Send us your comments, questions, and contributions to lundquist989@cs.com.

Contact Ned at lundquist989@cs.com.

 

*** In this issue:

***  Ned’s upcoming travel:

***  Feeling insecure: Pre-Checked?  Pre-Rejected?

***  Ned’s January trip tp Sweden by way of Austria:

***  I love Kayak.  So does mother.

***  Norweigian airlines

***  World’s Best Hikes: 20 Dream Trails

***  Value of Frequent-Flyer Miles Will Soon Drop for Delta and United Travelers

***  Check out these amazing hotels

***  Confessions of Hotel Housekeepers

***  Fodor’s Travel Names Top Destinations for 2014

***  Condé Nast’s GOLD LIST 2014

***  Lonely Planet’s top destinations for 2014

***  Virginia’s Acorn Crop Very Light This Year

***  Learn to Handle Back Country Emergencies

***  Video Interlude: Take a Few Minutes to Fly with Air Tahiti Nui

***  Which perk is morer important?  Mini-bar or Free Wi-Fi?

***  A cave is just a hole sitting on its side

***  Time to start planning summer expeditions

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: January 2014

Florida’s Blountstown Greenway Bike Path

 

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Osprey Watcher, The Center for Conservation Biology, Williamsburg, VA (various locations)

2.)  Internships, The Center for Conservation Biology, Williamsburg, VA

3.)  Volunteer, The Nature Conservancy, Arkansas

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

1.)  Manager, Corporate Marketing Partnerships, The Nature Conservancy, Washington, DC

2.)  Office Manager (Part-Time), Golden Gate Audubon Society, Berkeley, California

3.)  Lead Burn Crew Member, The Nature Conservancy, Lexington, Kentucky

4.)  Chapter Liaison and Communications Assistant, Cheetah Conservation Fund, Alexandria, VA

5.)  Communications Coordinator, Oregon Wild, Portland, Oregon

6.)  Habitat Restoration Coordinator/Project Manager, The Freshwater Trust, Portland, Oregon

7.)  Snowmaking Supervisor, Seven Springs Mountain Resort, Seven Springs, PA

 

…and much more…and it’s all FREE!!!

*** Do you have a travel adventure, conservation or outdoor update  to share?

Send me your stories and I’ll post in the “Your Very Next Step” and on the YVNS website (http://www.yourverynextstep.com/).

 

***  Ned’s upcoming travel:

 

January 18-25, 2014 — Stockholm ; Karlskrona, Linkoping, Gothenberg, Sweden.

 

January 25-28, 2014 — Helsinki, Finland

 

January 28 – February 1, 2014 — Portsmouth, UK

 

March 17 – 20, 2014 — Accra, Ghana

 

March 24 –  28, 2014 — Monetery, Calif.

 

June 2 – 4, 2014 — Abu Dhabi, UAE

 

***  Feeling insecure: Pre-Checked?  Pre-Rejected?

 

Thanksgiving holiday…went to Baltimore (BWI) airport. Two security people standing at the entry to the security line waved me off to a new security line (security area C), saying that I had been pre-cleared by TSA for expedited screening, meaning I didn’t have to remove my laptop or take my shoes off. I looked at my boarding pass, printed at the office, and could see nothing special that indicated pre-clearance. But no one else was at security C, the security agent stamped an X in a circle on my boarding pass and I zoomed through.

 

On the way BACK to Baltimore, I printed my boarding pass at the airport. It clearly said TSA PRE at the top. I had to go through the regular line with all the other people.

 

This makes no sense, being backwards of what should have happened. I have no idea why the TSA selected me and then rejected me.

 

I have NOT paid the $100 fee to TSA for pre screening, had an interview, etc.

Anyone else have this experience?

 

Sue Bumpous

 

***  Ned’s January trip tp Sweden by way of Austria:

 

(Written before departure) – My upcoming trip to Sweden has been booked (not by me) on Austrian, with a five hour layover at Vienna.  I’ve done a little research on line and I can’t say the majority of reviews about Austrian and thweir lounge at Vienna are great.  Even thiough I have Star Alliance Gold / United MileagePlus Premier Platinum status, I can’t reserve a seat without paying (more than $100 for an exit row window), until 36 hours before departure.  But Austrian is a new carrier for me, and Vienna will be a new airpot.  So watch for my review in an upcoming issue of YVNS.

 

As an aside, I will also be flying two flights on Norweigian and one on SAS on this trip, and returning from London on United.

 

Apart from the Norwegian miles, I’ll accumulate some miles on my UA MileagePlus account.  But new rules on United make it much more difficult to earn Priemier qualifying milede.  There ‘s a minimum dollar amount you have to spend, and tickerts must be written by UA.  This makes it doubly and triply difficult to attain elite staus starting in 2014.

 

Since USAirways is now American, Washington Reagan National goesa from being a Star Alliance hub to a One World hub.  I fly a lot of flights on US, but book my miles on UIA.  Time for a new strategy.

 

***  I love Kayak.  So does mother.

 

http://www.jaunted.com/story/2014/1/22/65517/6651/travel/New+Kayak+Ad+Deemed+Offensive+and+Insensitive+and+Reprehe…Yawn

 

***  Norweigian airlines is all the good things a low cost carrier should be (cheap, efficient), and apparently none of the really bad things it could be (arogrant, rude).  I flew from Stockholm to Helsinki, a one hour flight, and paid extra for two bags and seat selection ($11 for the exit row window).  The plane-a new and spacious 737-was half full, so I would have been able to sit in a window seat if i picked my seat at checkin. Norweigian touts themselves as being the “greenist” fleet in Europe, partly because its planes and thus its engines are newer and more fuel efficient.  You pay for drinks and snacks, so I declined to buy a cup of coffee, but the flight was not long.

 

Because I originally thought I was going to have just one bag, I had to purchase an additional “bag” at the airport the night before my flight (if it was 24 hours

 

before the flight I could have done so online and saved some money, but it wasn’t much to begin with).  Armed with my voucher, I had now problems checking two bags the next morning.  Airport checkin and security were pretty standard.  I wasn’t running late, so no pressure, and I seated myself at the gate and read my book.  The planes are spotless.  The seats comfortable.  Staff is friendly.  Air fares are cheap.  If only I could get miles where I could use them, but that’s another story, right?

 

***  World’s Best Hikes: 20 Dream Trails

From national Geographic

http://adventure.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/trips/best-trails/worlds-best-hikes-dream-trails/

 

***  Value of Frequent-Flyer Miles Will Soon Drop for Delta and United Travelers

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-12-19/value-of-frequent-flier-miles-will-soon-drop-for-delta-and-united-travelers#!

 

***  Check out these amazing hotels:

http://www.huilohuilo.com/en/accommodations

 

***  Confessions of Hotel Housekeepers

by Laura Daily, AARP The Magazine

http://www.aarp.org/travel/travel-tips/info-02-2013/hotel-housekeepers-share-cleaning-and-gratuity-tips.html

 

***  Fodor’s Travel Names Top Destinations for 2014

http://www.successfulmeetings.com/Conference-News/Site-Selection/Articles/Fodor-s-Travel-Names-Top-Destinations-for-2014/?cid=eltrMtgNews

 

***  Condé Nast’s GOLD LIST 2014

 

The World’s Best Places to Stay

http://www.cntraveler.com/gold-list/2014

 

***  Lonely Planet’s top destinations for 2014

http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/29/travel/lonely-planet-best-destinations/

 

***  Virginia’s Acorn Crop Very Light This Year

 

Oaks are among the most common hardwood tree species in many parts of Virginia. Because of their importance both as a source of forest regeneration and as a mast crop for wildlife, each year’s acorn crop is the subject of much attention. Many reports from various parts of the Commonwealth indicate that the acorn crop this fall is very light, according to officials at the Virginia Department of Forestry (VDOF) and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF).

 

VDGIF Upland Game Bird Biologist Gary Norman noted, “Acorn production in Virginia in 2013 was low – comparable to the previous low in 2008. The white oak crop appeared to uniformly fail across the state, while some pockets (generally in eastern Virginia) of good red oak production were found. Mast production has alternated from high to low levels since 2010. The impacts of acorns on wildlife populations are extensive and complex. And they are most dramatic where there is little diversity of habitat types and few alternative food sources to acorns.”

 

VDGIF biologists are concerned about a light crop because acorns are a preferred food for many wildlife species, including white-tailed deer, black bear and wild turkey. Oftentimes the search for food creates situations that bring wildlife closer into residential areas to find human-related food sources resulting in unwanted interactions between animals and people.”

 

http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/outdoor-report/2013/11/27/#acorn-crop-very-light-this-year

 

***  Learn to Handle Back Country Emergencies with Wilderness Medical Associates, The Chewonki Foundation, Wiscasset, ME

 

Two wilderness medicine courses are offered each year on the Chewonki campus in Wiscasset. Trip leaders, outdoor professionals and outdoor enthusiasts who want sound strategies for dealing with emergency medical situations in wilderness settings benefit from these thorough programs. The internationally renowned staff of Wilderness Medical Associates (WMA) teaches these intensive courses. Instructors combine morning lectures with realistic simulations that are videotaped and critiqued. WMA courses are widely considered the most complete medical training for outdoor professionals.

 

Please note: These courses fill early. Advance registration is recommended.

 

http://www.chewonki.org/news_detail.asp?news=209

 

***  Video Interlude: Take a Few Minutes to Fly with Air Tahiti Nui

 

We hope that Santa brought you exactly what you wanted this year, and if not there’s always your credit card to bring happiness in the final few days of 2013. We’re thinking some airfare is probably a good idea, and that’s especially the case if you’re headed somewhere aboard Air Tahiti Nui.

If you need further evidence that French Polynesia is a place that you need to visit just head to YouTube, as there’s a new video—shot with one of those GoPro things—that’ll quickly sell you on the idea of a visit.

 

The thing runs about five minutes in length, and it reveals views from the cockpit, the wing, the ground crew, and plenty of crystal clear water. If you don’t have time to visit before the end of the year that’s fine, as 2014 can certainly be your chance to check out Air Tahiti Nui and one of their warm weather destinations. It’s certainly on our list!

 

http://www.jaunted.com/story/2013/12/26/8433/1573/travel/Video+Interlude%3A+Take+a+Few+Minutes+to+Fly+with+Air+Tahiti+Nui

 

***  Which perk is morer important?  Mini-bar or Free Wi-Fi?

 

A recent TripAdvisor.com survey finds that the minibar isn’t getting much love. In fact, just 21% of travelers say it’s an important amenity in a hotel, and many hoteliers believe it will soon be a thing of the past. According to analysts, minibars pull in no more than 0.24% of hotel revenue. Lynn Mohrfeld, president of the California Hotel and Lodging Association, said minibars are a hassle because of fees and restocking.

 

http://www.latimes.com/business/travel/la-fi-mo-the-hotel-mini-bar-extinct-20131226,0,5825766.story#axzz2pOMH8xWZ

 

***  A cave is just a hole sitting on its side:

 

Cave Adventurers, Mill Pond, Marianna, Florida

http://www.caveadventurers.com/

 

***  Time to start planning summer expeditions:

 

BWCA/Quetico Lake Database

 

If this is your first time (or your 50th time) to the Boundary Waters, you should consider hiring an outfitter. There are many outfitters in the area. They are very experienced in helping people plan canoe trips. Their services range from renting canoes to full-fledged outfitting and guiding. They can help you with any or all of the steps below. If this is your first trip to the BWCA (especially if it is your first canoe trip), I would highly recommend talking to an outfitter. Their knowledge and services will greatly enhance your experience, and you will probably enjoy your trip a lot more. See our list of outfitters for more information.

 

The basic steps for planning a canoe trip are:

1.Decide when and where you want to go

2.Reserve a permit (BWCA or Quetico)

3.Review the rules and regulations

4.Buy the necessary maps

5.Make sure your canoe is licensed

6.Obtain a Minnesota fishing license (if desired)

7.Plan, prepare, and pack the food

8.Pack your gear

9.Pick up your permit the day before or day of your entry date

10.Drive to the entry point and enter on the day on your permit

11.Have fun!

 

The Superior National Forest has a publication titled 2013 BWCAW Trip Planning Guide that is a good reference in addition to the steps and information that are outlined here.

 

BOUNDARY WATERS

CANOE AREA WILDERNESS

T R I P P L A N N I N G G U I D E

http://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5417451.pdf

 

http://www.mncanoeing.com/tools/lakedatabase.aspx

 

*** National Rail-Trail of the month:

Trail of the Month: January 2014

Florida’s Blountstown Greenway Bike Path

 

Straddled between two well-known tourist hubs in the Florida Panhandle is Blountstown, a small city in Calhoun County with only two traffic lights. Nonetheless, it is a growing destination. At the center of this movement is the Blountstown Greenway Bike Path, which was taken from an unlikely prospect to the “heartbeat of the community” by a surprising trail hero, a radio-station owner.

 

“When the planning was going on, there were some who couldn’t imagine spending the money on a walking and biking trail that now can’t imagine life without it,” says Kristy Terry, executive director of the county’s chamber of commerce.

 

She continues, “Blountstown is about 50 miles from Tallahassee on its east side and Panama City to the west. We get lots of pass-through traffic. Many [people] who are headed to the beach from Tallahassee, or who are on their way to Tallahassee for a football game, stop and stretch their legs here and really enjoy the trail.”

 

Offering a pleasant respite for both road-weary travelers and locals, the trail’s northern end is pine forest and gently rolling hills that give way to swampy lowlands as it ventures toward the Apalachicola River. Even through downtown, it retains its serene character; restaurants and shops just a few feet away are accessible but don’t disturb those on a quiet retreat, and the lush natural surroundings are a haven for wildlife.

 

“I saw three deer yesterday, and I’ve seen foxes, wild hogs, hawks and a coyote,” says Ben Hall, the city’s fire chief, who runs on the trail every day after work. “It’s safe and well marked. About the only thing you might have to worry about is a squirrel running up your pants leg.”

 

Its very peacefulness and beauty have gone a long way toward dispelling the fears that surfaced when the idea for the trail was first brought forward more than a decade ago.

 

“Opponents were worried about potential crime associated with the trail. They worried that there would be people loitering up and down the trail,” says David Melvin, owner of Melvin Engineering, the firm that guided the trail’s development. “But they came around after the trail was complete. They couldn’t catch the vision of it until they really saw the use. Now it’s a huge source of pride for the community.”

 

The trail’s purposeful design, stringing together the city’s most-prized attractions, also enriches and broadens the experience that one would anticipate from a mere four-mile trail. One of these highlights is the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement on the north end of the trail. With several historical buildings in a rustic farm setting—a schoolhouse, blacksmith shop, grist mill and others—the museum provides a glimpse of life in Northwest Florida during the 19th and early 20th centuries.

 

Mid-trail, exhibits inside the restored depot at M&B Railroad Memorial Park tell the story of the Marianna and Blountstown line on which the rail-trail was built. Out front, the railroad’s original steam locomotive #444 is a cheerful sight with its cherry-red caboose. With less than 30 miles of track, the railroad was Florida’s shortest, but it was so important to the region that the M&B was dubbed “Meat and Bread.” During its long tenure, from 1909 to 1972, it carried, at one time or another, agricultural products, lumber, manufactured goods, mail and passengers.

 

“Tourism is considered one of our best forms of economic development,” says Terry. “We see the trail as a way to capitalize on the resources that we have.”

 

For Hall, the trail’s value is personal. “I started running two-and-a-half years ago for health reasons,” he says. “I’m 5’6″, and I weighed 200 pounds. My doctor said, ‘You’ve got to do something, or I’m going to have to put you on medication.’ So I just started walking, then running, and lost 50 pounds. At first, I could only run for five minutes. Now I’m training for an ultra-marathon that should take five hours.”

 

This current zest for the trail has come a long way from its beginning in the late 1990s when faith in the trail was less certain. “The city and county governments were pretty hesitant on going forward with it,” says Melvin. “They had concerns about how it would work and if it would benefit the community.”

 

But there was one person who never doubted. “Harry Hagan was a real champion for the project,” says Melvin. “He pushed the project through major hurdles because he thought it would make a real difference in the community.”

 

Hagan could be considered a celebrity for a place like Blountstown. He owns two local radio stations, WYBT (1000 AM) and WPHK (102.7 FM), which broadcast music and community news. He is also involved in the city’s Rotary Club. A runner or bicyclist he’s not; he’s simply a citizen with a vision for the trail and the will to see it through.

 

It was a long and arduous journey. “It’s not an easy thing to put one of these trails together. There’s a lot of opposition to them,” says Hagan. “It took us 15 years to do it. It didn’t just happen.”

 

In addition to obstacles of perception, there were logistical hurdles to face. “The biggest issue in those early days was acquiring the right-of-way,” says Melvin. “The Marianna and Blountstown Railroad was in bankruptcy court, and there were confusing titles to the property. It was a real challenge to make it happen.”

 

Rails-to-Trails Conservancy became involved in 1996, purchasing the corridor from bankruptcy court and later selling a section of the corridor to the Florida Department of Transportation who in turn conveyed it to the City of Blountstown. To move the project forward, RTC also developed a concept plan for the trail and made presentations to the city commissioners to advocate for the trail.

 

In 2005, the developing pathway got a boost when it was designated as part of the Florida Trail, a hiking and backpacking route winding through the state from the Georgia border to the Everglades. The trail stretches more than 1,000 miles and is one of 11 such National Scenic Trails in the country (including the well-known Appalachian Trail). It’s maintained and constructed by the U.S. Forest Service and the Florida Trail Association (FTA), whose Panhandle Chapter now helps out with the Blountstown Greenway.

 

But the real payoff came in 2007 with the gleaming of golden, oversized scissors snipping the trail’s ribbon under a bright April sun. Music, food and colorful balloons greeted the droves of people who came to celebrate the trail’s completion and explore the novel recreational asset.

 

Today, the trail continues to be a venue for several races and community events each year, including the popular 5K Catfish Crawl, which the fire department organizes to raise scholarship funds for high school students. It draws about 300 people, a significant amount for rural Florida and a sign of how much the trail has truly been embraced.

 

On a visit last April, Ron Peterson, chair of FTA’s Panhandle Chapter, organized about 20 hikers for a trek down the Blountstown Greenway. Not only did Mayor Tony Shoemake greet them at the railroad museum, he joined them for lunch. This welcoming nature of the city was just one of many reasons that FTA also named Blountstown a Gateway Community for the Florida Trail.

“I love the interactions I have with people on the trail,” says Hall. “I get a lot of thumbs up, high fives and fist bumps. It makes it fun.”

http://www.railstotrails.org/news/recurringFeatures/trailMonth/index.html

*** Trail/Outdoor/Conservation volunteer opportunities:

 

1.)  Osprey Watcher, The Center for Conservation Biology, Williamsburg, VA (various locations)

http://www.osprey-watch.org/

 

2.)  Internships, The Center for Conservation Biology, Williamsburg, VA

 

Interns and technicians are the lifeblood of field research

 

Much of the field research that CCB conducts requires teams of biologists that are often deployed in remote locations.  Interns and technicians represent critical components of those teams and CCB has been fortunate to have had several hundred dedicated interns and technicians working on projects over the years.

 

Additional information will be posted here on application deadlines for the Summer internship Program and Shorebird internship Program. Interns are typically hired in the fall of each year.

 

http://www.ccbbirds.org/what-we-do/education/internships/

 

3.)  Volunteer, The Nature Conservancy, Arkansas

 

Volunteer in Arkansas

 

Are you interested in

•Working with others who share your love of nature?

•Contributing your time and skills to an organization you believe in?

•Broadening your resume and life experiences?

 

If you answered yes to any of these questions, we’ve got some great opportunities for you. Volunteers help The Nature Conservancy devote a major portion of its funds to land conservation, keeping our effectiveness high and our costs low.

 

Contact Us

 

The Nature Conservancy of Arkansas

601 North University Avenue

Little Rock, AR 72205

Phone: (501) 663-6699

Fax: (501) 663-8332

 

Ozark Highlands Office

38 West Trenton Blvd., Suite 201

Fayetteville, AR 72701

Phone: (479) 973-9110

Fax: (479) 973-9135

 

Staff

Worldwide Office: +1 (703) 841-5300

 

http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/arkansas/volunteer/index.htm

 

*** Travel/Adventure/Outdoors/Conservation employment opportunities:

***  From Jennifer Jackson:

 

Hi,

 

I’d like to have a position posted on your website.   Here are the details and feel free to contact me if you need any additional information.

 

Jennifer Jackson

The Nature Conservancy

Worldwide Office

Arlington, VA

 

1.)  Manager, Corporate Marketing Partnerships, The Nature Conservancy, Washington, DC

 

POSITION SUMMARY:

The Corporate Marketing Partnerships Manager is responsible for identifying, cultivating, negotiating and securing new cause-related marketing and sponsorship programs that generate revenue, awareness and consumer engagement for The Nature Conservancy’s mission and conservation goals.

 

The Manager will research and cultivate priority corporate partners that are capable of increasing visibility and funding for the Conservancy through innovative marketing programs/campaigns.  At the same time, s/he will be responsible for working with senior team members to develop creative pitches, sponsorship packages and comparable benefits for existing and potential partners. The Manager may also be responsible for negotiating financial terms and contracts with new corporate partners. S/he will manage internal review/approvals/tracking and communication of Corporate Marketing Partnerships to various committees and internal stakeholders.

 

The Manager will also develop, manage and implement program logistics, including relationships with internal and external partners and outside vendors. This role will implement marketing/promotion plans—engaging corporations, developing promotional materials, and working with internal operating units to implement social media, web, media relations and creative efforts associated with the goals of each partnership.

 

HOW TO APPLY

To apply to position number 41731 , submit resume and cover letter as one document.

 

All applications must be submitted in the system prior to 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on January 17th 2014.

 

Failure to complete all of the required fields may result in your application being disqualified from consideration. The information entered in the education and work experience sections are auto screened by the system based on the basic qualifications of the position.

 

You must click submit to apply for the position. Click save if you want to be able to return to your application and submit it later. Once submitted, applications cannot be revised or edited.

 

EOE STATEMENT

The Nature Conservancy is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

 

https://careers.nature.org/psp/P91HTNC_APP/APPLICANT/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM.HRS_CE.GBL?Page=HRS_CE_JOB_DTL&Action=A&JobOpeningId=41731&SiteId=1&PostingSeq=1

 

2.)  Office Manager (Part-Time), Golden Gate Audubon Society, Berkeley, California

http://www.philanthropynewsdigest.org/jobs/6794-office-manager-part-time

 

3.)  Lead Burn Crew Member, The Nature Conservancy, Lexington, Kentucky

 

The Nature Conservancy is the leading conservation organization working to make a positive impact around the world in more than 30 countries, all 50 United States, and your backyard. Founded in 1951, the mission of The Nature Conservancy is to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends. Visit www.nature.org/  aboutus to learn more.

 

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS

 

The Lead Burn Crew Member participates in wildland fire operations which include ignition, control, mop-up, suppression, monitoring, etc.  The Lead Burn Crew Member will oversee Burn Crew Members with preparing fire lines, maintaining equipment, post-burn monitoring and other tasks. The Lead Burn Crew Member will perform and coordinate other preserve management duties when conditions are not conducive for prescribed burning

 

Assist with, oversee, and coordinate the following activities:

• Perform prairie and forest restoration activities including invasive species eradication using both mechanical and chemical treatments.

• Perform preserve maintenance activities including, but not limited to, boundary marking, trail maintenance and fence repair.

• Maintain fire and stewardship equipment including off-road vehicles, tractors, chain saws, and various hand tools.

• Prepare weekly reports.

• Assist Director of Land Management with other duties as assigned.

 

BASIC QUALIFICATIONS

 

• High school diploma and 1 year training in fire operations or other science-related field or related experience in land management.

• Qualified Fire Fighter Type 1 (Squad Boss). Requirements for FFT1 can be found in the Conservancy Fire Management Manual at: http://www.tncfiremanual.org/SquadBoss.htm.

• Experience operating and maintaining various types of equipment.

• Experience supervising staff is required.

 

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS

• High school diploma and 2 years training in fire operations or other science-related field or related experience in land management.

• Qualified as or able to quickly meet qualifications for NWCG Firefighter Type 1 (Squad Boss) position. Requirements for FFT1 can be found in the Conservancy Fire Management Manual at: http://www.tncfiremanual.org/SquadBoss.htm.

• Ability to operate and maintain various types of equipment in a safe and efficient manner

• Ability to follow instructions from colleagues and supervisor

• Ability to evaluate inputs in a rapidly changing work environment and make decisions that affect firefighters within squad.

• Ability to perform physical work, sometime under adverse conditions or in inclement weather

• Ability to achieve physical fitness standard as set by local Fire Manager

• Obtain licenses and certifications related to first aid.

• Obtain related licenses or certifications such as CPR, herbicide application, driver’s license.

• Experience recognizing plant and animal species.

• Experience operating various types of equipment including power tools, tractors and off-road vehicles.

• Experience loading and pulling trailers.

• Experience performing physical work.

• Valid driver’s license.

• Experience working with and knowledge of natural systems.

 

ADDITIONAL JOB INFORMATION

 

• The Lead Burn Crew Member to lead up to three Burn Crew Members from February – June 2014.

• The position is based in Munfordville, KY where crew housing is available.

• This position requires extensive travel throughout Kentucky.

• Primitive camping may be required while traveling.

 

AUTO SAFETY POLICY

 

This position requires a valid driver’s license and compliance with the Conservancy’s Auto Safety Program.  Employees may not drive Conservancy-owned/leased vehicles, rental cars, or personal vehicles on behalf of the Conservancy if considered “high risk drivers.”  Please see further details in the Auto Safety Program document available at www.nature.org/careers.

 

Employment in this position will be contingent upon completion of a Vehicle Use Agreement, which may include a review of the prospective employee’s motor vehicle record.

 

WORKING CONDITIONS/PHYSICAL EFFORT

 

The Burn Crew Manager may work in variable weather conditions, at remote locations, on difficult and hazardous terrain and under physically demanding circumstances. These conditions:

• require considerable physical exertion and/or muscular strain

• present frequent possibility of injury

• require long hours in isolated settings

 

BENEFITS-SHORT TERM POSITIONS

 

The Nature Conservancy offers competitive compensation, 401k or savings-plan matching for eligible employees, excellent benefits, flexible work policies and a collaborative work environment. We also provide professional development opportunities and promote from within. As a result, you will find a culture that supports and inspires conservation achievement and personal development, both within the workplace and beyond.

 

SALARY INFORMATION :  $15.00/hour

 

HOW TO APPLY :  To apply to position number 41754, submit resume and cover letter as one document.  All applications must be submitted in the system prior to 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on January 14, 2014.

 

Failure to complete all of the required fields may result in your application being disqualified from consideration. The information entered in the education and work experience sections are auto screened by the system based on the basic qualifications of the position.

 

You must click “submit” to apply for the position. You may select “save for later” if you prefer to create a draft application for future submission. Once submitted, applications cannot be revised or edited.

 

If you are experiencing technical issues, please refer to our applicant user guide or contact applyhelp@tnc.org.

 

EOE STATEMENT

 

The Nature Conservancy is an Equal Opportunity Employer.  Women, minorities, veterans and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

 

The successful applicant must meet the requirements of The Nature Conservancy’s background screening process

 

https://careers.nature.org/psp/P91HTNC_APP/APPLICANT/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM.HRS_CE.GBL?Page=HRS_CE_JOB_DTL&Action=A&JobOpeningId=41754&SiteId=1&PostingSeq=1

 

4.)  Chapter Liaison and Communications Assistant, Cheetah Conservation Fund, Alexandria, VA

http://www.indeed.com/cmp/Cheetah-Conservation-Fund/jobs/Chapter-Liaison-Communication-Assistant-73bfd983b43a59b1

 

5.)  Communications Coordinator, Oregon Wild, Portland, Oregon

 

Founded in 1974, Oregon Wild is a non-profit conservation organization with a history of accomplishment. Our victories include safeguarding over 1.7 million acres of Wilderness and 1,800 miles of Wild & Scenic Rivers through federal legislation, legal victories that have protected hundreds of thousands of acres of old-growth forests and preserved critical wetland habitat, and the preservation of numerous endangered species, from coho salmon to northern spotted owls. Oregon Wild enjoys a national reputation as a pioneering organization that is both highly strategic and effective, with strong policy expertise.

 

The Communications Coordinator catalyzes public demand for protecting Oregon’s wildlands, wildlife, and waters. This position involves specific electronic communications, media outreach, and writing tasks as well as general outreach duties to current or prospective Oregon Wild supporters.

 

This is a diverse and fast-paced position requiring experience in advocacy or campaign communications. The focus of this position is on increasing public and political support for Oregon Wild conservation campaigns though electronic communications and social media; outreach to traditional print, radio, and television outlets; and the development and use of effective public messaging.

 

Position Responsibilities

 

Electronic Communications (50%):

• Develop and implement an overall electronic communications strategy, encompassing social media, website, email, and other resources, to increase support for Oregon Wild campaigns

• Grow the Oregon Wild supporter base of online supporters, activists and donors

• Coordinate e-mail action alert lists, Facebook page, Twitter feed, blog, and other electronic communications, assigning writing and content generation as necessary

• Oversee the Oregon Wild website, including the coordination of a 2014 redesign and content update

• Shoot and edit video and audio clips, produce video spots and other materials to support advocacy campaigns

• Working with other staff, develop and place content on major blogs and other online publications

 

General Communications (40%):

• Draft and distribute press releases, editorial board mailings, opinion columns, and letters to the editor

• Maintain Oregon Wild media distribution lists, distribute press releases and other materials to the news media

• Make pitch calls to reporters and editorial writers to generate media coverage of Oregon Wild campaigns

• Organize regular press events, teleconferences, editorial board briefings, field tours and other forums to promote Oregon Wild campaign objectives

• Provide drafting and editorial support on fact sheets, appeal letters, postcards, and other written materials including occasional conservation reports

• Working with the Conservation Director and appropriate staff, develop communications strategies and messaging in support of Oregon Wild conservation campaigns

 

Outreach Functions (10%):

• Generate public comments in support of Oregon Wild conservation goals

• Recruit and educate prominent community members, business leaders, and others as spokespeople for conservation campaigns

• Organize occasional outreach events such as Oregon Wild Wednesday, film screenings, happy hours, etc

• Other duties as assigned

 

Qualifications

Required:

• Experience in electronic communications, preferably in an advocacy or political campaign setting

• Ability to balance competing deadlines across multiple campaigns

• Excellent writing skills for traditional and online formats

• Excellent oral communication skills

• A keen sense of effective communications and campaign strategies

• A demonstrated commitment to protecting and restoring Oregon’s wildlands, wildlife, and waters

Desired:

• Experience working with traditional print, TV, and radio media

• Skills in HD video filming and editing

• Knowledge of Salsa CRM or similar supporter management and e-mail action tool

• Experience working in Drupal CMS or similar website management platform

• Experience working in Adobe InDesign and Adobe Photoshop

 

Salary and Benefits:

This is a full time, exempt position that includes benefits. Some evening and weekend hours will be required. The starting salary for this position is between $32,000 and $40,000, depending on experience. Benefits include paid health insurance, 403(b) retirement plan option, generous vacation, and other paid time off.

 

 

Application Guidelines/Contact:

Applications must be sent by e-mail to: jobs@oregonwild.org. Please submit a cover letter, resume, and two work samples consolidated into a single PDF or Word document. Review of completed applications will begin on February 3, 2014.

 

Salary:

$32,000 and $40,000, depending on experience

http://www.macslist.org/macs-list/Oregon-Wild/Communications-Coordinator/p7KWn6MLZGCh/

 

6.)  Habitat Restoration Coordinator/Project Manager, The Freshwater Trust, Portland, Oregon

https://www.macslist.org/macs-list/The-Freshwater-Trust/Habitat-Restoration-Coordinator-Project-Manager/pkZtc6d2m9dS/

 

***  From Mark Sofman:

 

7.)  Snowmaking Supervisor, Seven Springs Mountain Resort, Seven Springs, PA

http://bit.ly/KofnyC

 

 

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